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Full text of "Report of the Board of Regents"

Vol. ffl. UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO BULLETIN No. 8 



THE 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 

BULLETIN 



Report of the Board of Regents 

1907-8 



jNIVERSrft oP"'"^'^^'^ 




,4—— 



PRKSlCfiNt^S fiirWCF, 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY, DECEMBER, 1908 
Eatered at the Postoffice as second clau mall matter. 



Vol. III. UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO BULLETIN No. 8 



THE 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 



BULLETIN 






DEC 2 



9 V 



VJiii 



Report of the Board of Regents 

J 907-8 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY, DECEMBER, 1908 
Entered at the Postoffice as second class mail matter. 



I^XIVEKSITY OF IdAHO^ OFFICE OF THE KkGEXTS OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF Idaho . 

Moscow, Idaho, November 30, 1908. 
To tJic Governor of Idaho : 

Sir — r liave the honor to present for yonr consideration 
the report of the Board of Regents of the University of Ida- 
lio for the period beginning- Jannary 1, 1907, and ending 

December 31, 1908. 

MARIS E. LEWIS, 

President of Board of Regents. 



»• 



REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 



INTRODUCTION. 

In preseutiiig- the Report of the Regents of the ITniver- 
sity of Idaho for the biennial period, 1907-8, I wish to pre- 
face the detailed account of our administration of the af- 
fairs of the I^niversity by some remarks of a general char- 
acter. Broadly speaking, two sets of influences have de- 
termined the policy of the regents during this period — the 
one general and affecting the countr^^ as a Avhole — the 
other local, originating in the history and state environ- 
ment of our own institution. 

Throu2:hout the United States todav there is a stronc: 
educational movement in the direction of practical educa- 
tion. This affects not only the so-called institutions of 
higher education, but every part of the public school sys- 
tem. It is ar2:ued that the education of todav should be 
brought nearer the life of today, and that learning should 
be directed not to the past but to the present and the fu- 
ture. Further it is believed that our svstem of education 

ft, 

should include training for every trade, occupation, voca- 
tion, or profession in life, that whenever skill, or knowl- 
edge, or art, or science is required in any occupation, the 
opportunity of obtaining the necessary training should be 
offered somewhere in our public school system. When 
this movement has fully established itself, more people Avill 
go to school and will stay in school for a longer period, 
teachers will be required in many branches not now repre- 



4 rp:port of tiik rkgrnts 

sented in the curriculum, and many buildings and much 
equipment will be needed that Avill bear little resemblance 
to our i>resent school buildings and school equipment. We 
are just at the beginning of a great educational movement 
that will profoundly change the aims and ideals of our 
public schools and broaden the scope and character of ed- 
ucation all along the line^ and we have tried to shape the 
policy of the University, when need and occasion arose, in 
conformity with these new and sound and vitalizing edu- 
cational ideals. 

The second set of influences were local in character. The 
University was still stunned by the loss occasioned by the 
Are, and it was necessary to provide liberally for classroom 
accommodaticm, scientific equipment, libraries, and stu- 
dent enterprises, as a basis for hope and confidence, and 
scholastic enthusiasm. The high schools of the State were 
rapidly developing and specially needed the active co-op- 
eration of the members of the University faculty during 
their transition period. The great resources of the State 
were being uncovered, many of our industries were in the 
experimental stage, and the agricultural, scientific and en- 
gineering departments were required to devote a great deal 
of time to making tests which seemed to possess public 
values. The student body was increasing rapidly and re- 
quired counsel and encouragement in the development of 
numerous student activities which represent a considera- 
ble portion of the attractiveness and effectiveness of a col- 
lege course. In their action in respect to one and all of 
these questions the regents have attempted to represent 
faithfully the people of the State in developing the full ef- 
ficiency of th(i faculty and in bringing the University to the 
point of highest usefulness and service to the State. 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 5 

The regents of the TTniversity have held nine 

THE BOARD meetings (hiring the biennial period, on the 

OF REGENTS, following dates in 1907: March 20th and 

21st, in Boise, adjourned to Moscow, March 
26th to March 29th ; June 10th to June 13th in Moscow ; 
July 10th in Boise, adjourned to July 15th in Boise; Aug- 
ust 20th to August 24th in ^^loscow; December 12th to 
December 13th in Moscoav; and in 1908, April 8th to April 
10th in Moscow; June 9th to June 11th in Moscow; Oc- 
tober 19th to October 21st in ]Moscow ; and December 15th 
in Boise; nine meetings in all and 31 days of session. On 
jMa.rch 27th, 1907, the board was organized as follows : 
President, M. E. Lewis; Vice President, Geo. 0. Parkin- 
son; Secretary, Mrs. S. H. Hays; and Treasurer, W. L. 
Payne. On the resignation of j\[r. Parkinson, Mr. O. E. 
McCutcheon of Idaho Falls was appointerl by the Governor, 
and attended the meeting held April 8th, 1908, and sub- 
sequent meetings. On the resignation of Mr. Jas. H. Mc- 
Carthy, Mr. E. H. Moffitt of Wallace was appointed by the 
Governor to fill the vacancv, and attended the meeting 
held June 6th and subsequent meetings. On June 11th, 
1908, the board was organized as follows : President, M. E. 
Lewis; Vice President, E. S. Sweet; Secretary, Mrs. S. H. 
Hays. 

A large number of changes in the faculty 
THE FACULTY, occurriug through resignations and new 

appointments or additions have been acted 
upon by the board in the last two years, and in filling va- 
cancies the board has been careful to advertise the vacan- 
cy widely throughout the universities of the United States 
with the view of securing the maximum of teaching ef- 
ficiency in the appointee. 

From January, 1907, to September, 1908, resignations 



6 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

were received from Professor L. H. Henderson, Economic 
Entomologist and lUant Pathologist of the Experiment 
Station, and connected with the University from 1893 to 
1908; l*rofessor \V. W. Baden, professor of Greek and 
J^atin, 1899-1907; Professor B. E. Janes, professor of Min- 
ing and Metallurgy, 1905-1908; Lieutenant George E. 
Steunenberg, professor of Military Science and Tactics, 
1905-1907; Mrs. M. E. Young, Preceptress and Director of 
Domestic Economy, 1902-1908 ; jNIiles P. Reed, principal of 
the Preparatory School and Instructor in Education, 1902- 
1907; Professor (Jeorge A. Crosthwait, Agrcmomist of the 
Experiment Station, 1904-1907 ; Miss Rosa A. Forney, In- 
structor in Modern Languages, 1902-1908; Miss Elizabeth 
Ryan, Instructor in Domestic Economy, 1905-1907; Mr. 
Tor A^an Pyk, Instructor in Voice Culture, 190()-1907; Mv. 
John G. Griffith, Instructor in Biology in the Preparatory 
Department, 1902-1907; Mr. B. S. Allen, Instructor in 
English in the Preparatory Department, 1905-1907; Miss 
Carrie F. Thompson, Assistant in German, 1906-1908; 
Mr. T. C. Galloway, Instructor in Chemistry, 1907-1908; 
Mr. F. A. Rapp, Instructor in Civil Engineering, 1908. 

In the same period the following appointments were 
made: Professor J. R. Shinn, Professor of Horticulture, 
and Horticulturist of the Experiment Station (1907) ; 
Professor J. H. Frandsou, Professor of Dairying, and 
Dairyman of the Experiment Station (1907) ; Lieutenant 
A. VV. Smith, Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
(1907); Professor R. E. Hyslop, Professor of Agronomy 
and Agronomist of the Experiment Station (1908) ; Pro- 
fessor H. L. Axtell, Associate Professor of Greek and Latin 
( 1908) ; Miss I Berenice S. Maynard, Instructor in Domestic 
Science (1907); ('. ('. Tull, Instructor in English Lan- 
guage (ad intrrim) (1907) ; T. (\ (Jjillowny, Instructor in 



OF THE rXIVKUSITV OF IDAHO. • i 

Clieiiiistry (1907) ; Sol. E. Hiitton, Instructor in Mechan- 
ical Eui^ineering (1907) ; F. A. Rapp, Instructor in Civil 
Engineering (1908) ; Mrs. J. L. K. Haner, Instructor in 
Domestic Art and Drawing (1908) ; Miss Sylvia S. Smith, 
Instructor in English in the Preparatory School (1907) ; 
John R. Middleton, Instructor in Mathematics in the Pre- 
paratory School (1907) ; Evan T. Sage, Instructor in 
Classics in the Preparatory School (1907) ; Arthur P. 
Vaughn, Instructor in Sociology (1907) ; Miss May A. 
Caldwell, Instructor in Voice Culture (1908) ; Miss Per- 
meal French, Dean of Women (1908) ; Prof. A. C. Terrill, 
Professor of Metallurgy (1908) ; Professor W. II. Chedsey, 
Associate Professor of Mining (1908) ; Professor E. E. El- 
liott, Dean of the College of Agriculture, and Professor of 
Agricultural Education (1908) ; Professor Carl Von Ende, 
Professor of Chemistry {ad interim) (1908) ; Professor 
Eber D. Kanaga, Professor of Physical Education (1908) ; 
Professor Lewis P. Shanks, Associate Professor of Ro- 
mance Languages (1908) ; Stuart Sims, Instructor in Civil 
Engineering (1908) ; C. K. Glycart, Instructor in Chem- 
istry (1908) ; L. V. Beaulieu, Instructor in Preparatory 
Mathematics (1908) ; Miss Nellie A. Regan, Instructor in 
Preparatory German and History (1908) ; Carl Grissen, 
Instructor in Music (1908) ; Miss Sadie Stockton, As- 
sistant in Music (1908) ; W. K. Gwin, Assistant in Chem- 
istry (1908) ; E. J. Carey, Band Master (1908). 

Two new departments have been es- 

CHANGES IN COURSES tablished, viz. : The Department of 

OR METHODS OF Physical Education and the Depart- 

INSTRUCTION. uicut of iVgricultural Education. 

The Department of Modern Lan- 
guages has been divided into the Department of German 



« REPOKT OF THK KKdKXTS 

and the Department of Ttomance Languages, and the De- 
l)artnient of Mining lias been divided into the Dei>artment 
of Metallurgy and the Department of :Mining Engineering. 
Instruetorshii)s have been established in Civil Endneerinir, 
Sociology, and Domestic Art, and a four-year college 
course in ^Mechanical Engineering has been announced. 

The Department of Physical Education. — In September, 
1908, a Professor of Physical Education was appointed to 
take charge of the physical training of all the students of 
the University, anthropometrical examinations, cor- 
rective exercises and gymnasium classes. The phy- 
sical examinations of students are now completed, 
gvmnasium classes begim and corrective exercises out- 
lined. Courses in physiology and personal hygiene con- 
tinue throughout the year and may be elected by college 
students. A minimum of gymnasium work is required of 
all pre])aratory students and may be elected by all college 
students. Formerly the athletic trainiuG: of the University 
was incidental, occasional and undirected, and was prac- 
tically confined to those students Avho participated in the 
various games and used the gymnasium. The students 
who really needed the exercises did not take them, and 
those who took them in the absence of competent direction 
derived very little lasting benefit from them. Tt is ex- 
pected that the establishment of this department will place 
the physical education of the individual student on a 
sound pedagogic basis and transfer the center of interest 
from the now all-absorbing intercollegiate games to the 
laws of health and the exercises that are necessary to es- 
tablish and maintain it. 

The Department of Agricultural Education. — The es- 
tablishment of the Department of Agricultural Education 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 9 

is in recognition of the great revival of interest in agri- 
cultural education in its relation to our public school sys- 
tem. With the demand for increased instruction in agri- 
culture is associated the need for trained teachers in agri- 
cultural subjects in schools of all grades. The importance 
of agricultural education in tlie training of the rural 
teacher has been recognized bv the State normal schools, 
and the TTniversity Department of Aii^ricultural Education 
will find its special field in the training of agricultural 
instructors to take charge of aericultural courses in estab- 
lished high schools, and in special agricultural schools of 
secondarv c^rade which mav be established bv State, conn- 
ty, or municipal action. It will be the aim of the depart- 
ment to meet the special responsibilities arising in the field 
of secondary education and to assist and co-operate in the 
general plan of increasing the amount of ac^ricultural in- 
struction throughout the public school system of the State. 

Probablv the most careful investi^^a- 

THE STANDARDizA- tiou of the various educational insti- 

TION OF STATE tutious of the couutry made in recent 

UNIVERSITIES. vears is that the results of which the 

trustees of the Carnegie fund for the 
advancement of teaching have published. The benefits of 
the Carnegie fund are limited to schools with full college 
rank. 

To rank as a college an institution must require of stu- 
dents for admission to its freshman year four full years of 
high school work. This is reckoned in studies as 14 units, 
each unit representing one subject studied five times per 
week for one school year. Schools to be reckoned colleges 
must have this 14-unit minimum as their requirement for 
admission. 



10 



REPORT OF THE REGENTS 



The table of State T'niversitios as ])ul»lis]ied by the Car- 
negie Trustees is as follows : 

University. Academic Standard in Units. 

1. Alabama iq 

2. Arizona ^^5 

3. Arkansas 20 

4. California 15 

5. Colorado 15 

6. Florida 99 

7. Georgia n 

8. Idaho 15 

9. Illinois 14 

10. Indiana 15 

1 1 . Iowa 15 

12. Kansas 15 

13. Louisiana 9.5 

14. Maine 13.5 

15. Miami 14 

16. Michigan 14 

17. Minnesota 15 

1 8. Mississippi 11 

19. Missouri 15 

20. Montana 14 

21. Nebraska 14 

2 2. Nevada 12 

23. New Mexico 15 

24. North Carolina 11. fi 

2 5. North Dakota 13 

26. Ohio (Athens) 12 

27. Ohio State 14 

28. Oklahoma 15 

2 9. Oregon 15 

3 0. South Carolina 5.2 

31. South Dakota 15 

•>2. Tennessee 10 

3 3. Texas 11.4 

34. Utah 10.7 

3 5. Virginia 8.4 

36. Washington 15 

3". West Virginia 12.5 

3 8. V^'isoonsin 14 

39. Wyoming 14 

Studying the report of the trustees, it is found that there 
are thirty-nine state universities. Fourteen of these are 
rated at 15, that is, they re(juire work represented by 15 
units before a student can be admitted to their freshman 
year. Eight more are ranked at 14. Thus a little over 
half of the whole number are classed as collegiate by the 
• Carnegie fund trustees. Those failing to be so ranked are 
for the most part in the Southern Stat(\s. The University 



OF TIIR TTNIVKRSITV OF IDAHO. 11 

of Idaho ranks in the highest chiss, those requiring 15 units 
for admission. 

Througli the co-oporatiou of tlie (.'arnegie Conuiiission, 
the National Association of 8tate Tniversities, and the As- 
sociation of American Universities, it is expected that a 
system of objective university standards may be worked 
out in the near future and established for all the colleges 
and universities in the United States. 

RETIRING ALLO WANCES. 
In 1905 Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave into the hand of 
trustees selected by himself securities amounting to ten 
million dollars to be known as the Carnegie Foundation 
for the Advancement of Teaching. The income from these 
funds is used in giving retiring allowances to university 
and college professors of advanced age. Certain restric- 
tions were placed as to the institutions admitted to the ac- 
cepted list, all colleges under denominational control being 
excluded and also, originally, all state institutions. ^^ 
an additional donation of five million dollars in 1908, it 
has been made possible for the Trustees to comply with 
the request of the National Association of State Universi- 
ties that state universities be admitted to the benefits 
of the fund, if in other respects eligible. In order to be 
placed upon the accepted list it is necessary that two con- 
ditions be met: (1) That a State university come up to 
the standard of scholarship laid down by the Trustees for 
their guidance in disbursing the allowances; and (2) that 
api)lication be made to the Trustees by the Legislature of 
the State desiring to participate in the advantages of the 
fund. The first condition is already met by the high 
standard of the University of Idaho (see the Bulletin of 



12 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

the Carnegie Founrlation for the Advancement of Teach- 
ing, March; 1907, page 22). It only remains, therefore, 
for the State Legislature to take action in the matter at 
the coming session. 

Aside from the pecuniary value to the State in future, 
it marks out an institution as beinji: of the hi2:hest educa- 
tional rank to be admitted to the accepted list, since of the 
thirtv-nine State universities onlv twentv-two, or a little 
over one-half, are at present eligible on account of educa- 
tional standards, while the Fniversitv of Idaho shares the 
highest honors in this regard with but thirteen. 

CLASSIFIED SYSTEM OF HONORS. 

On November 12, 1908, the Faculty took action in a 
matter that is likely to prove of great importance to the 
future scholarship ofthe Fniversitv, namely, the adoption 
of a classified honor system. It was pointed out that while 
success in activities outside the class room, such as debat- 
ing, athletics, and social affairs, Avas fully recognized and 
spread abroad, success in the real business of the Fniver- 
sity — scholarship — was too little known or appreciated 
even within the institution and not at all outside. To rem- 
edy this condition it was voted that hereafter two sorts of 
honors shall be aAvarded, (1) Class Honors, based upon 
the work of the preceding year only, and known as First- 
Year Honors, Second-Year Honors, and Third-Year Hon- 
ors; and (2) Final Honors, based upon a student's general 
average for his entire course. Class Honors are divided 
into two groups, known as Class B and Class A, each re- 
quiring a certain average of scholarship for the year. Final 
Honors, on the other hand, are divided into three groups, 
called, respectively, Honors, High Honors, and Highest 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 13 

Honors. The award of Highest Honors will be conferred 
only by special vote of the Faculty at graduation, and will 
be based upon the following considerations: (a) The at- 
tainment of the requisite average (at least two-thirds A 
grades, the remainder to average B, or higher) ; (b) resi- 
dence for at least Junior and Senior years at the Univer- 
sity of Idaho; and (c) a capacity for intensive work. This 
highest group in Final Honors is so difficult of attainment 
that in the Class of 1908, graduated last June, only one 
member would have been eligible to receive it, but the 
lower grades of honors are sufficiently broad, so that any 
student of reasonable capacity for intellectual work and 
proper diligence can attain them. 

• 

ATTENDANCE, 

As has been the case for the last eleven years, there is 
again this year a larger number of college students than in 
any previous year. From various causes the attend- 
ance in the Preparatory Department has always fluctu- 
ated considerably in different years. The present yedr 
shows a considerable increase in that department over last 
year, yet its present enrollment is almost precisely that of 
ten years ago, and about fifty less than that of fifteen years 
ago, the next year after the University opened. The expla- 
nation of this apparent anomaly is that in the past fifteen 
years, and particularly in the last seven years, the high 
schools over the State have shown a wonderful develop- 
ment, so that, while a far greater number are now seeking 
an education beyond what is offered in the graded schools, 
more and more are now enabled to obtain it in the high 
school of their own town. Over a score of towns in the 
State now offer a full four-year course of study, amply 



14 REPORT OF Tin: RIXJENTS 

justifying the policy of the T^niversity in setting the stand- 
ard of admission as high as in any State university in the 
country. 

In 1907-08 there Avere reiyistered in the University, ex- 
elusive of twenty-eight special students in music and short 
courses in agriculture, a total of four hundred twenty-six 
students (42B) ; for this academic year the total to De- 
cemher 5, 1908, is four hundred forty-five (445). This will 
undoubtedlv be increased bv new students at the beirinninu- 
of the second semester. Tn the corresponding Report of 
the Board of Regents of two years ago the figures are 
three hundred ten (810) and three hundred fifty-six (356) 
for the previous two years, showing a thoronghly satisfac- 
tory increase in attendance. 

There are students in attendance from the follownnc!: 
twentv-one connties of the State: Ada, Rannock, Rear 
Lake, Ringham, Rlaine, Roise, Ronner, Oanyon, Cassia, 
Custer, Elmore, Idaho, Kootenai, Latah, Lemhi, Nez Perce, 
Oneida, Owyhee, Shoshone, Twin Falls and Washincton. 
One or more students are recfistered from California, Colo- 
rado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, ^Tinnesota, North Carolina, 
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Washing- 
ton, and Wisconsin, while two students come from Rritish 
Columbia and Denmark, respectively. 

Eleven of this year's new students have passed one or 
more years in other colleges, as follows : Knox College, 
Morningside College, College of Idaho, Iowa State Uni- 
versity, Occidental College, University of Wyoming, Co- 
lumbian College (R. C.), TTarvard University, University 
of Minnesota, University of Cincinnati, and the University 
of Paris (France), while several are graduates of nornuil 
schools. 



OF THE UXIVKKSITV OF IDAHO. 15 

The most notable feature in the enrollment of the pres- 
ent year is the large increase in the number of students 
pursuin^i' the Agricultural Course. In 190G-07 these num- 
bered three; in 1907-08, eleven; while in 1908 to December 
1st no less than twenty-eight are pursuing college courses 
in agriculture, while some eleven more are pursuing pre- 
paratory courses, making a total of thirty-nine agricultural 
students. The students in the Oollege are pursuing courses 
leading to degrees as folloAvs : Bachelor of Arts, 65 ; Bach- 
elor of Science, 25; Bachelor of ]\rusic, 18; Bachelor of 
Science in Domestic Economy, 10; Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture, 28; Bachelor of Science in ^Fining, 49; Bach- 
elor of Science in Civil Engineering, 32; Bachelor of 
Science in Electrical Engineerincf, 22, and Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanical Engineering, 8. 

The average age, in September, 1908, of all college stu- 
dents was twenty-one years, three months and nine davs. 
The young women in college number eighty-three, or about 
33 per cent; in the Preparatory Department they number 
^o'ontv. or about 36 per cent. 

COURS^Ef^ OF n^F^TRVCTJOTW 

Tn connection with the standard of admission and the 
requirements for graduation, the courses of instruction 
which are being actually given in an institution at any 
one time offer one of the most important indexes of its 
value and rank educationallv. These number for the first 
semester of 1908-09, in the College, one hundred thirtv-five 

(135), a considerable number of which are taught in more 
than one section ; in the Preparatory School, twenty-six 

(26), making a total of one hundred sixty-one (161) sub- 
jects or classes. Some of these continue throughout the 



16 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

year, while others will be followed in the second semester 
by other subjects. The table below shows the exact sub- 
jects given in each department during the first semester 
of the present year, together with the number of students 
taking each subject, though it should be said that in many 
cases students have entered courses since the class-lists 
upon which these statistics are based were made out. 

By comparison with the report of two years ago the 
following new departments of instruction will be noticed : 
Dairying, Drawing, Horticulture, Physical Education, 
Sociology, and Spanish. In addition, through the sub- 
division of three heavy departments, more effective teach- 
ing is being done and a greater variety of courses offered. 
The Department of Domestic Economy is now handled by 
two instructors, one having the courses in Domestic Art, 
and the other, the courses in Domestic Science. Mining 
and Metallurgy, formerly combined, have been made sej)- 
arate departments. The department of Modern Languages 
has been divided into two departments, German and Ro- 
mance Languages. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION, FIRST SEMESTER, 

1908-09. 

COIjI.EGI]. No. of 

I Greek: Credits. Stuclent.s 

Course 1 Plato 3 4 

3a Greek Prose Composition 2 3 

5 Aeschylus 2 2 

9 History of Greek Literature 2 8 

II Latin: 

1 Cicero's De Senectute 4 9 

3 Selected Poems of Horace 3 6 

7 Lucretius 2 7 

HI Germar: 

1 FJemertary German 5 33 

3 Intermediate German 4 2 5 

5 Schiller 3 . IS 

7 LessinK 2 10 

9 Goethe 3 4 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 17 

No. of 

IV French: Credits. Student.s 

1 Elementary French 5 33 

3 Intermediate French 4 15 

11 The Romantic School 3 11 

13 Advanced French 2 2 

V Spanish: 

1 Elementary Spanish 3 15 

VI English Language and Literature: 

la Composition and Rhetoric 3 81 

3a Composition 2 63 

3b Shakespeare 2 34 

9 The English Novel 3 13 

11 Nineteenth Century Poetry 3 6 

15 Great Books 2 5 

17 Advanced Composition 2 7 

19 Advanced Shakespeare 3 ' 4 

21 Old English 3 3 

23 Theory of Good Usage 1 8 

VII Public Speaking: 

3 Oral Debate 3 10 

VIII History: 

1 The Early Middle Ages 3 18 

3 The Renaissance 3 17 

5 English History 2 9 

7 The Eve of the French iievolution 2 7 

9 American Colonial History 3 13 

13 Historical Seminar 1 3 

IX Political Science: 

4 Public International Law 3 4 

5 General Principles of Economy 2 7 

X Sociology: 

3 Social Psychology 3 9 

XI Philosophy: 

5 Introduction to Philosophy 4 12 

XH Education: 

1 History of Education 3 13 

5 Theory and Practice 2 16 

XHI Mathematics: 

1 College Algebra 5 92 

5 Analytic Geometry 4 30 

7 Integral Calculus 4 14 

8 Differential Equations 3 2 

XIV Physics: 

1 General Physics 3 5C 

la Experimental Electricity 1 16 

3 Elementary Electiicity and Magnetism. ... 3 23 

5 Theoretical Mechanics 3 15 

7 Electricity 3 4 

XV Chemistry: 

la General Chemistry 4 13 

lb General Chemistry 4 32 

Ic General Chemistry 4 20 

3 Qualitative Analysis 4 29 

5 Carbon Compounds 3 6 

7 Advanced Quantitative Analysis 2 7 

XVI Biology: 

1 Principles of Biologj'' 2 5 

5 General Zoology 4 21 

17 Plant Anatomy and Physiology 4 6 



18 KHPORT OF TIIK Ki:(;i:xTs 



• 



XVII Music: js^o. of 
Piano — Credits. Students 

la Freshman . 2 R 

3a .Sophomore 2 8 

5a Junior 2 2 

7a Senior 2 2 

Special 21 

Theory — 

lb Freshman 2 12 

3b Sophomore 2 8 

5b Junior 2 3 

7b Senior 2 -2 

History — 

5c History of Music 2 3 

Vocal Music: Individual instruction continued 

for four year 12 

Choral Instruction 4n 

Violin 7 

Orchestral Instruction 10 

Military Band I*' 25 

XVIII Drawing: 

1 Form Study 2 4 

3 Charcoal Drawing- 2 3 

X7X Domestic Economy: 
Domestic Science — 

lb First Year Cookery 2 41 

3b Second Year Cookery 2 16 

5b Food Lectures 2 6 

7b House Sanitation 2 5 

9b Invalid Cookery 2 11 

lib Practice Teaching 2 2 

Domestic Art — 

la Plain Sewing 2 22 

3a Advanced Sewing 1 11 

5a Dressmaking 2 4 

7a Household Art . 1 7 

11a Practice Teaching 2 1 

XX Physical Education: 

5 Physiology and Histologj' 2 4 

XXI Military Science and Tactics: 

1 Regulations 1 54 

3 Military Science 1 36 

XXTI- Agronomy: 

3 CereaLs 4 5 

7 Soil Fertility 4 2 

Preparatory Agronomy 2 11 

XXITI Animal Husbandry: 

1 Bre(Hls of Live Stock 2 18 

3 Principles of Feeding 4 2 

Dairy Livestock 2 6 

XXIV Dairying: 

1 Butter Making 3 6 

3 Milk Testing 2 , 7 

7 Dairy Practice 4 7 

8 Farm Dairying 3 8 

10 Testing and Milk Inspection 2 8 

XXV' Agricultural Chemistry: 

1 Dairy Chemistry 1 6 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 19 

No. of 

XXVI Horticulture: Credits. Students 

1 Principles of Fruit Growing 5 15 

5 Landscape Gardening- 3 9 

XXVII Bacteriology: 

1 General Bacteriology 1 17 

5 Dairy Bacteriology 1 7 

(Also Biology C, Preparatory) 4 33 

XXVIII Civil Engineering: 

a Lettering 2 45 

1 Surveying 4 29 

3 Railroad Engineering 3 8 

5 Testing Laboratory 2 6 

7 Trussed Roofs 2 11 

9 Masonry and Foundations 3 9 

11 Sewers and Sewerage 2 6 

13 Roads and Pavements 2 9 

15 Bridges 4 6 

17 Reinforced Concrete 2 5 

19 Descriptive Geometry 2 23 

XXIX Mining and Metallurgy: 

1 Assaying 2 6 

5 Metallurgy of Gold and Silver 3 8 

7 Metallurgy of Lead 2 12 

9 Metallurgical Laboratory 3 6 

1 1 Mining Lectures 3 4 

17 Economics of Mining ..2 6 

19 Thesis 1 6 

XXX Geology and Mineralogy: 

1 General Geology 3 14 

3 Mineralogy 2 6 

5 Petrography 2 7 

7 Economic Geology 2 6 

XXXI Machine Design: 

1 Mechanical Drawing 2 14 

5 Machine Design 2 7 

7 Electrical Design 2 1 

XXXII Shop Work: 

1 W^ood Working 2 3 7 

4a Forge Practice 1 13 

5 Machine Work in Iron 4 9 

XXXIII Mechanical Engineering: 

3 Steam Boilers 2 5 

11 Power Station Design 2 1 

Mechanical Eng. for Dairy Students 1 5 

XXXIV Electrical Engineering: 

1 Electromagnetism and Dynamos 3 6 

5 Alternating Currents 4 1 

7 Electrical Laboratory 3 1 

9 Electric Transmission 4 2 

11 Telephony 2 1 

13 Secondary Batteries 1 1 



20 



REPORT OF THE REGENTS 



COUR.'^ES OF INSTRUCTION, FIRST SEMESTER, 

1908-09. 

PREPARATORY. No of 

I English: Periods. Students 

D Ninth Grade English 4 32 

C Tenth Grade English 4 56 

B Eleventh Grade English 4 55 

A Twelfth Grade English 4 34 

II German: 

B Beginning German 4 29 

A Second Year German 4 48 

III Greek: 

B Beginning Greek 5 2 

A Xenophon 3 1 

IV Latin: 

D Beginning Latin 5 43 

C Second Year Latin 5 40 

B Cicero 4 15 

A Vergil 4 12 

V History: 

D Ancient History 4 34 

C Medieval and Modern History 4 38 

B English History 4 19 

VI Mathematics: 

D Algebra 4 35 

C Plane Geometry 4 53 

B Plane Geometrj' 4 52 

A Solid Geometry 4 35 

VII Natural Science: 

C Zoology 3 34 

B Physics 5 48 

A Chemistry 4 42 

VIII Public Speaking: 

A Oral Debate 2 12 

IX Agriculture: 

C Agronomy 3 - 9 

X Shop Work: 

B Wood Working 2 21 

XI Business Course: 

C Bookkeeping: 2 ' 25 



REPORT OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 

In the college years of 190G-07 aiicl 1907-08 the members 
of the committee on secondary schools have visited forty- 
four high schools, two State normal schools, one State 
academy, and ten private 'academies. All of these insti- 
tutions have been placed upon the list of accredited schools. 
The Universitv t»iv(^s credit to each school for the work 
given in any of the subjects that are acce])ted for college 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 21 

entrance. Twenty-two of the hi\^h schools have a four 
year course, nine have a three-year course, ten have a two- 
year course, and three give only a one-year course. Six 
years ago scarcely a half dozen high schools in the State 
gave a full four-year course. Tt is also gratifying to he 
ahle to report that most of the other schools are actively 
planning to increase the length of their courses. 

The quality of work in our secondary schools shows 
marked improvement. Many of the teachers are gradu- 
ates of normal schools and universities ; libraries are being 
increased; and the laboratories are being installed. The 
University began its work of inspecting the work of second- 
ary schools seven years ago. At that time not one high 
school in the State was housed in a separate building. At 
present all are fairly well provided for in the matter of 
rooms; and many of them are in excellent new buildings 
devoted entirely to high school work. 

It is safe to predict that the next two years will witness 
an even greater increase in the number of our public 
schools and in the character of their work; and it is con- 
fidently believed the co-operation between the schools and 
the University will show a corresponding increase. Fol- 
lowing is the list of schools visited by the members of the 
University committee on secondary schools and listed for 
varying amounts of credit: Academy of Idaho (Pocatello), 
Bellevue, Blackfoot, Boise, Bonners Ferry, Burke, Cald- 
well, Cambridge, Coeur d'Alene, Coeur d'Alene College, 
College of Idaho, Caldwell, Cottonwood, Emmett, Genesee, 
Glenns Ferry, Grangeville, Hailey, Harrison, Hope, Idaho 
Industrial Institute (Weiser), Idaho Falls, Juliaetta, Kel- 
logg, Kendrick, Lewiston, Malad, Meridian, Montpelier, 
Moscow, Mountain Home, Mullan, Nampa, New Plymouth, 



22 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

Nez Perce, Paris Academy, Parma, Payette, Pocatello, Post 
Falls, Preston Academy, Rathdrum, Rexburg Academy, St. 
Anthony, St. Margaret's Hall (Boise), Salmon, Sand 
Point, Shoshone, Twin Falls, Wallace, Wardner and 
Weiser. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES. 

The Associated Students of the University of Idaho is an 
organization of the whole student body, formed for the 
purpose of controlling and directing student activities. The 
organization recognizes three principal departments — ath- 
letics, debate and oratory, and the college paper, each of 
which is under the direct control of a particular board, 
subject to the general supervision of the executive com- 
mittee of the Associated Students. 

The department of athletics is managed by the Athletic 
Board. Contests in football, baseball, basket ball, and on 
track and field are arranged annually with the State Uni- 
versities of Montana, Oregon, Utah, and Washington, 
Whitman College, and Washington State College. During 
the 1908 season the football team played the Universities of 
Oregon and Utah, Whitman, and Washington State Col- 
lege, Spokane Y. M. C. A., and Bremerton Marines. The 
final score was 88 in favor of Idaho to 42 for all opponents. 

The intercollegiate contests in debate and oratory are 
under the control of the Debate Council, which is com- 
posed of six members elected by the student body and two 
faculty advisory members elected by the Council. Annual 
debates are held with the Universities of Washington and 
Oregon, and ^^'asliington State College. 

In all tliese events Idaho has been uniformly successful. 
The record in the Uuniversity triangular debate since its 
establishment is as follows: 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OP IDAHO. 28 

1906. 1907. 1908. Total 

Idaho 5 3 7 15 

Oregon 3 7 1 11 

Washington 4 2 4 10 

It Avill be seen that Idaho debaters won first place two 
3^ears of the three, and second phice on the third year, also 
that in 1908 they captured seven points ont of a possible 
eight. A debating society is maintained by the students 
in connection with the department of debate, and keen in- 
terest is stimulated in this line of work by the annual dis- 
tribution of a number of prizes to winners of contests, both 
in debating and oratory, within the University, prizes 
which amount in the aggregate to hundreds of dollars. 

''The University Argonaut" publishes the student and 
University news weekly, under the direct control of a staff 
elected annually by the student hodj. The department of 
music publishes a monthly magazine called "Music." The 
students of the College of Agriculture publish an illus- 
trated agricultural monthly, ''The Idaho Student Farmer," 
which is gaining a circulation among the agriculturists of 
the State. The Young Men's and Young Women's Chris- 
tion Associations put out yearly a small manual of infor- 
mation useful to new students, and the Junior Class pub- 
lishes an illustrated annual, "The Gem of the Mountains." 

Student clubs are organized in connection with several 
departments of the University, all of which plan for extra- 
classroom study of related subjects, with an admixture of 
social interest and entertainment. Thus the English Club 
gives in its plays and delightful evening programs some of 
the results of the daily study in the department of English. 
The Classical Club meets monthly, reading authors not in- 
cluded in the courses and following illustrated travel lec- 
tures on Greece and Italy. The Deutsche Gesellschaft holds 



24 



REPORT OF THE RE(JEXTS 



bi-Aveekly meetings for conyersation and literary study. 
The Biology Club program includes both social evenings 
and collecting excursions to the neighboring mountains. 
The Agricultural Club's bi-Aveekly meetings are addressed 
often by those who have made notes on the agriculture of 
other countri(^s while traveling, or by specialists and ex- 
perts in agricultural methods whenever possible. The Ida- 
ho Sociological Society, which includes in its membership 
all persons connected Avith the sociology courses, and thus 
centers in the T^niversity, is planned as a State organiza- 
tion, with its membership open to all persons definitely in- 
terested in the improvement of social institutions and con- 
ditions within the commonwealth. The department of 
music has frequent public recitals under the auspices of 
its various clubs, and no organizations of the University 
can rival in popularity Avith the student body the mandolin 
and men's and women's glee clubs. The State Preparatory 
School students also haA^e an organization, the Alphian 
Literary Plub, Avith large membership, meeting bi-AA^eekly 
and presenting programs Avhich include debates, recita- 
tions, essays, readings and music. 

AGRWULTURE IN THE ^^ECONDARY SCHOOLS. 

The most striking feature of the modern educational 
moA'ement is the creation and groAvth of what Ave call our 
High Schools. The curriculum arranged for these schools, 
folloAving as it does closely on that of the primary grades, 
furnishes instruction of a distinct character to Avhich has 
been giA'en the name, Secondary P^ducation. 

Naturally the framers of courses for this secondary edu- 
caticm have considered the earlier and ])rimary instruction 
as basic, and much of- th(^ secondary instruction does not 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OP IDAHO. 25 

nppoar to have a fnndaineiital cliaractor. The exact rela- 
tion of such education both to that Avhich has preceded, as 
well as to that which mav follow is evidentlv not clearlv de- 
fined nor urider stood. 

Tn fact, Secondary Education is still in a process of 
evolution, and its most ardent supporters are ea2:erly scru- 
tinizin^i' the frequent suji^ii'estions for its improvement in 
tlie hope that it may be made of more oeneral application 
and of cjreater efficiencv as an educational force. 

The modern hi«h school is the legitimate successor of 
the old-fashioned academv Avhich flourished half a centurv 
aao as a preparatory school for the college or university. 
While still larjs^ely takinc: this place as a fittinn: school for 
more advanced courses, the hiiih school no longer finds 
itself limited to such a sphere. As the boundaries of the 
oraded school are beino- more and more clearly defined, so 
the courses of the Secondary schools are beiuG: continually 
broadened with reference to the varyino' needs of students, 
who are to pass from there directly into the various pur- 
suits and industries of our American communities. 

In the irreat majority of the hic^h schools the completion 
of the course marks the end of the educational career of 
the avera,2:e student. The more ambitious and better for- 
tuned pass on into the sphere of some college or university, 
but a larger number take up at once the active duties of life 
in some capacity. "Recognizing this fact, the necessity be- 
comes urgent for more completely directing the trend of 
this secondarv instruction, so that it mav bear a direct re- 
lation to the manner of life which this great number of 
students must at once undertake, and serve in a measure 
as a training for it. 

Just what studies should be included in such a life-pre- 



26 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

paratory course, if the phrase may be permitted, even our 
best educators are not fully agreed upon. Out of the 
vagueness and uncertainty one fact is evident, which is, 
that the particular form that such education^ should take 
will be most properl}^ determined b}' the local community 
it is intended to serve. Instead of a fixed and set system 
of education to which all the youth of the land, must be 
adjusted, whether bred in the city or the country, in the 
shadow of the factorv or the seclusion of the farm, there 
should and will be a flexible course where the impulse re- 
ceived from the instruction given will naturally fit and pre- 
pare them for the sphere of life which the larger majority 
will inevitably occupy, while at the same time not unfit 
them for entrance into other spheres should their destiny 
so direct. 

It will not folloAV that all or most of the old-fashioned 
courses of studv will be abandoned. Some of these undoubt- 
edly will be, but there Avill rather follow a redirecting of 
the subject matter contained in these courses. The num- 
ber and variet}' of subjects offered will, no doubt, be 
greatly increased in the immediate future. Some few of 
the old ones will be sooner or later replaced or abandoned, 
but the teaching of all of them will be transformed, and 
the real test of the popularity of these courses will be that 
of actual utility. That this readjustment is now going on 
is evidenced by the late report of the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction for Illinois, in which he brings out the 
fact that in the courses of the 416 high schools in the State, 
there is but one subject common to all, and that is algebra, 
but the entire list of subjects is now so greatly enlarged 
that they numl»er 48 altogether. AVitli such a variety and 
number being offered it is evident that the privilege of 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 27 

electives must be correspondingly enlarged, and we can 
easily see the coming of the day when in every community 
maintaining such a secondary school, there will be the 
fullest opportunity for securing that sort of an educatio?i 
which will be desired by the youth to be benefited. As the 
large majority of people must obtain a living by following 
industrial pursuits, it is but natural that the principles 
underlying these industries shall be taught, each in the 
community where it is more prominent. This will bring to 
the front in all rural as well as village communities, the 
general subject of Agricultural Education. It is not to be 
expected that this Avill find any considerable place in the 
outlines pursued in the High Schools of our large towns 
and cities, for these will magnify manual training and 
commercial courses as a fitting preparation for life. 

There are two plans being urged for the establishment 
of Secondary Agricultural Education. One would make 
such instruction a part of our public school system under 
the broad application of elective courses. This would 
make its adoption possible and jirobably general in the 
schools to which it might be adapted. The other plan pro- 
poses the establishment of high schools of a special char- 
acter, the whole scheme of instruction offered centering 
around the agricultural idea. It is probable that in the 
State of Idaho both plans may find an opportunity. 

The Regents of the State University desire to impress 
on the rural sections of the commonwealth the wisdom of 
early introducing this newest idea in education into the 
existing high schools. They hope to create such a favorable 
sentiment that it will not be necessary to follow the meth- 
ods of some eastern states, which make the teaching of 
subjects compulsory. It is perfectly possible to do this un- 



REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

der the present school laws, if public opinion will sustain 
the undertaking. 

Beyond this, however, a tremendous stride will be taken 
if legislation can be secured which will permit the estab- 
lishment of County Agricultural High Schools, in such 
counties as are most largely dependent on rural industries. 
This may mean the extension of the territorial area of ex- 
isting town high schools so as to include the adjacent coun- 
try, or in some communities the establishment of such a 
school to which the children of the entire county may have 
free access. If thus established, these county high schools 
should emphasize rural life education above all else, while 
still maintaining a high scholastic standard. They should 
offer advantages to girls as well as boys, and be under the 
control of teachers whose hearts are not only in the work, 
but who have received a good technical training for it. In 
the belief that such teachers will soon be in demand 
throughout the State, the College of Agriculture is urging 
on the attention of its students the preparation needed for 
undertaking such Avork and is offering special courses in- 
tended to fit them for it. Hitherto the demand for agri- 
cultural teachers has come entirely from the colleges but 
the great demand of the future will be for men and women 
to engage in the broader and more practical field opening 
up in the secondary schools, particularly of this State. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTESI. 

Farmers' institutes were held during the past two years 
in ten counties of tlie State. In 1907-8 twelve meetings 
were lield, making HO sessions, and 5,650 people attended 
the meetings. The cost of these meetings was |773.90, or 
less than fourteen cents per capita for those who were in 



OF THE UNIVEKSITY OF IDAHO. 29 

attendance. Instead of holding a large number of short 
institutes we have found it better to extend the meetings 
in certain localities to one week, thus enabling the instruct- 
ors to do much more thorough work than it is possible to 
do in one or two talks of thirty or forty minutes. 

The tendency now all over the country is to make the 
work more thorough by giving more time in each locality 
visited. 

In addition to the regular institute work a demonstra- 
tion train was run over the Northern Pacific railroad lines 
in Idaho last June. The train was in charge of the Experi- 
ment Station staff and visited fifteen towns along the line. 
The weather w^as rainy and unfavorable, yet over two 
thousand people attended the meetings, and visited the ex- 
hibition car, w^hich was equipped with dairy apparatus and 
various appliances for spraying trees and illustrating the 
lectures given on the trip. Several thousand Bulletins 
were distributed to people present at the meetings. The 
chief value of such work is to arouse enthusiasm and sret 
acquainted with the people and the conditions surround- 
ing farm life over a large area of country. The Oregon 
Short Line is arranging for a similar demonstration along 
its lines in Southern Idaho. Special cars are being 
fitted up for this Avork. The date of the proposed trip has 
not been fixed ; but we shall endeavor to carry it out early 
in spring or late in winter. 

There is an increasing demand for this 

INCREASING extension work. Several counties have 

DEMANDS FOR permanent organizations, and more wish to 

INSTITUTES. secure such institute associations as will 

enable them to keep up the meetings from 
year to year regardless of State aid. 



30 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

It is not necessary for me to speak of the great good 
growing out of such meetings. Such work is now recog- 
nized as a fixed policy in nearly every State in the Union, 
and has become one of the activities of the Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

In order to meet the demands of this work in this State 
at least |2,000 annually should be appropriated by the 
State. 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERJMENT STATION. 

Several changes in the personnel of the 

CHANGES IN Station force have occurred during this 

STATION STAFF, period. Some of the men have resigned 

to take up similar work in other institu- 
tions at advanced salaries, Avhile others have gone into com- 
mercial work, believing that the compensation would be 
greater. 

AVe regret to note the resignation of Professor Hender- 
son, who has been connected with station work in this in- 
stitution since it was founded, and uoav leaves the field to 
take up commercial work. Professor Henderson was loyal, 
energetic, and alwa3^s enthusiastic over the possibilities of 
station work. He has done much to further the interests of 
horticulture and agriculture in many of its branches in 
this State, and we shall miss his advice and assistance in 
matters pertaining to station activities. Certain lines of 
his work are being carried on temporarily by Mr. L. F. 
Parsons. Recommendations regarding this line of work 
are made elsewhere in this report. 

One new line of work has been introduced, that of dairy- 
ing. This is one of the most important lines of work, in our 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 31 

estiiiiation, and one which shonhl be encouraged in every 
way possible. There is not so much new or unexplored 
ground in the field of experimentation in this branch as in 
some other lines. FTowever, there are some unsolved prob- 
lems and a certain amount of time should be given to sta- 
tion work. 

At present writing, little station work has been done ow- 
ing to the demand for instruction in dairying, which has 
required a large portion of the time of the professor in 
this department. 

Some work of an experimental nature has been carried 
on and will furnish the foundation for a bulletin on mois- 
ture content of butter, as affected by storage at various 
temperatures and under varying conditions. Other experi- 
ments in determining the economic ccmditions in the pro- 
duction of milk and butter fat on the farms of Idaho will 
be undertaken in co-operation Avith the Department of Ani- 
mal Husbandrv. 

Nine regular bulletins have been pub- 
PUBLiCATiONS. lished in the past two years, tAVO annual 

reports and eight press bulletins. The 
bulletin editions number 7,500 each at present and soon 
will have to be increased to 8,000. There are nearly four 
thousand Idaho names on the list and the number is in- 
creasing rapidly. Several other circulars and announce- 
ments of short courses have been published by station men, 
and numerous articles contributed to the press. 

There is a standing committee of the station council on 
press matters and this committee has succeeded in placing 
considerable news material pertaining to station work be- 
fore the people of the State, through the local papers. 



32 REPORT OF THE REOENTS 

Two new departments in station work 

NEW should be provided as soon as possible. 

DEPARTMENTS. That of Bacteriologj, which touches nearly 

every phase of station work and a depart- 
ment for poultry investigations. Both of these are import- 
ant from an instructional point of view. The first one, that 
of Bacteriology, is found in nearly all courses in science of- 
fered in the Agricultural Colleges, and is one of the im- 
I)ortant departments in station work in many institutions. 
Animal disease as well as that of human beings is inti- 
mately associated with germ development and growth, so 
that a knowledge of this subject becomes of great import- 
ance to the station and college alike. 

The poultry industry is second to none in agriculture, 
and it needs special study here in the West where it is 
much neglected and consequentl}' fails to furnish the rev- 
enue that it should. Many experiment stations have taken 
up work in this line and there is considerable demand for 
information bearing on this subject as a branch of agri- 
culture in Idaho. This department will not require a large 
expenditure of money to start it, but some buildings and 
equipment should be provided. If a thousand or fifteen 
hundred dollars could be appropriated by the State for 
buildings the station might furnish the funds necessary 
for salary and supplies. 

The total area transposed from desert 
WORK IN and wilderness to productive uses is 

SOUTHERN IDAHO, vcry large and the change has just be- 
gun. This means that the agricultural 
})OI)ulati()n is certain to increase and become of greater 
j>roiniii(;nce in the State. This being the fact it is the part 
of \vis(]om to place significant stress on the upbuilding of 
our developing agricultural industries. 



OF THE UNIVEKSITY OF IDAHO. 33 

In addition to the work done at Caldwell, the State 
should provide for two additional demonstration farms or 
branch stations, as they might be termed, in the southern 
and eastern parts of the State. There is an in- 
creasing demand for this work in that section of 
the State. The irrigated lands are being occupied by 
people from every walk of life who seriously feel the need 
of object lessons in farming under irrigation, and the State 
can make no better investment than to assist these people 
in securing comfortable homes, and making them contented 
on these lands. There is no income from any source until 
the land is made to produce something. There is no native 
forest to clear away, and from which a living may be ob- 
tained while the land is being improved. Considerable assis- 
tance can be secured from the National Department of Ag- 
riculture, provided the State will assist in carrying on this 
work. For this work small tracts of land ( forty acres will 
be sufficient) should be secured with water rights and an 
appropriation from the State sufficient to carry on the 
work in co-operation with the Department of Agriculture. 
All necessary laboratory apparatus and material for re-, 
search work could be supplied from the station funds, and 
such work would be done at the home station at Moscow. 

Farmers on the cut-over timber lands 

WORK IN of Northern Idaho, in the neighborhood 

NORTHERN IDAHO, of Rathdrum, Sandpoint, and Bonners 

Ferry, are very much interested in se- 
curing some assistance in the Avay of a demonstration farm 
in that section of the State, This matter has been brought 
to our attention and we can readily see the importance of 
the problems with which the farmers of the north have to 
contend; and we have answered many inquiries regarding 



34 REPORT OF THE RICGEXTS 

the difficulties that liave to be overcome before the land 
can be made profitable in crop production. Some of these 
problems can be solved by the introduction of better meth- 
ods of cultivation and the securing* of better varieties of 
crops, those which are better adapted to the climatic and 
soil conditions. 

THE A UXTLTART STATION AT CALDWELL. 

The making? of permanent improvements on the Auxil- 
iarv Station farm at rabhvell, has been delaved on account 
of the ditficultv encountered bv the citizens of Caldwell, 
in perfecting- title to the lands selected for the purpose. 
These difficulties have been met up to this time, at an ex- 
pense of over .|;2,000, to the Caldwell citizens and they are 
to buy and turn over to the Reijents the paid-up water-ri<?ht 
to that portion of said lands under ditch, as soon as possi- 
ble. 

At the time the location was made, title to the lands 
selected rested in the Federal Government and was in- 
cluded in a reserve set apart for forestry experiments. 
Since then the citizens of Caldwell have secured the release 
of this land from jT^overnment control, and had it selected 
by the State Land Board as a portion of the Ao^ricultural 
College <irant. Here the title now rests. It is hoped that 
the tenth session of the State Lecislature will pass suitable 
laws allowing the State Land r>oard to place this land un- 
der control of the Recrents of the T^niversitv, for a lonji: 
period of years for experimental purposes, not less than 
thirty to fifty years at least. This is necessary as some of 
the experiments that will be undertaken by the station on 
this land, e. j>-., in forestry and fruit breedin2^, will extend 
over that i>eriod of time. As soon as this question is set- 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 35 

tied the Rej^ents are anxious to proceed with the perma- 
nent improvements as authorized by the Ninth Session, 
and those provided b^^ the Tenth, and subsequent sessions. 
The station is situated three and one-half miles 
LOCATION south of Caldwell, and was located in the sum- 
AND SOIL mer of 1906. It comprises the northeast quar- 
ter, section nine, and northwest quarter, section 
ten, township three north, range three west^ Boise merid- 
ian, three hundred and twenty acres, lying on an elevation 
with slopes to the northwest, north, and northeast. It ad- 
joins the proposed tree culture station 'of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, and is located on the Payette- 
Boise U. S. reclamation project. It is representative of the 
lands of that system. 

The soil and sub-soil on the station farm is the same as 
the prevailing tj^pe of land in Ada and Canyon Counties, 
considerable portions of Washington, Boise, Owyhee, and 
Elmore Counties and a small portion of Twin Falls Coun- 
ty. It is thus typical of about 2,500,000 acres of land in 
Southern Idaho, of which 650,000 are now under irrigation 
canals. The surface soil itself is the same as that Avhich 
occurs throughout the plains of Southern Idaho. 

The location is on the open sage brush plains where an 
annual precipitation of eleven and one-half inches occurs. 

In the fall and winter of 1906-7, 

PRESENT IMPROVE- eighty acres of land were cleared 

MENTS AND EQUIPMENT, of sagcbrusli and in the winter 

of 1907-8, sixty acres more. 
Eight}^ acres are fenced Avith rabbit proof fence. There are 
no permanent buildings on the farm except a small seed 
house. A small box house was on the place when turned 
over to the station and the teamster with his family now 



36 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

occupies it. The superintendent is obliged to live in town 
which makes it inconvenient for him to direct the work 
and give personal attention to the details of the experi- 
ments. A temporary shed-barn, a shed over the pumping 
plant and a shed for tools, have been added. The pumping 
plant, the box house and the other temporary sheds are lo- 
cated in the northeast corner, the lowest point on the farm. 
High ground near the center of the farm has been selected 
as a building site. Here a well has been drilled and an ex- 
cavation made for a cellar under the proposed dwelling 
house. A permanent building, a seed house, has just re- 
centlv been erected. 

The station is sorely in need of buildings 
NEEDS OF such as a dwelling house, an adequate barn, 
THE STATION, a tool shed and laboratory and office build- 
ing. The station further should have a 
team, a fanning mill for cleaning and grading seed grain 
and a wind mill to pump water for stock in winter and 
for domestic use. A small threshing outfit is also neces- 
sary in order that the station ma}^ be enabled to keep its 
grain clean and to thresh small lots of wheat or other grain. 
The station in addition needs liberal support to cover run- 
ning expenses and such improvement of the land as the in- 
vestigations require. 

The first work unrlertaken was that of clear- 
pRELiMi- ing eighty acres of land in the fall of 190G-7. 
NARY w^ORK. The necessary plats for experiments in irri- 
gation were also leveled and ditches con- 
structed at (hat time. Tlie farm lies above any canal then 
in operation, lience, no water could be secured by gravity 
flow. Tlie IMiyllis Canal, however, passes through the low- 
.est corner of Ihe farm and a pumping plant consisting of 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 37 

a gasoline engine and centrifugal pump was installed on 
the bank of the canal in the Fall of 1906. By means of this 
outfit sufficient water was raised to irrigate twenty acres 
of land. A canal of the Payette-Boise project now com- 
pleted covers about 85 acres of land on the farm. 

Cultivation being necessary to bring ncAv land into a 
productive state, the first year's Avork in a measure was 
preliminary. At the end of the first season's operations 
thirtA^-three acres had been improved. At the present time 
fifty-six acres have been brought under cultivation. The 
experiments were instituted and got under way in the 
spring of 1907, and have been conducted since that time. 

A familiarity Avith the character of the 

IRRIGATION soil ou the experiment farm, its capacity 

INVESTIGATIONS, for absorbing irrigation water, and the 

depth and rate of percolation being nec- 
essary for intelligent planning of experiments, considera- 
ble time was devoted to such investigations with the result 
that considerable data were secured. The behavior of the 
soil has been carefully noted and recorded and the amount 
of water applied measured. With records of the necessary 
preliminary work of subduing the land and improving it 
at hand, the station has a fund of knoAvledge Avhich may be 
drawn upon in advising ncAv settlers as to methods of pro- 
cedure on new land. 

The value of winter irrigation not being gen- 
AViNTER IR- erally appreciated and that phase of irriga- 
RiGATiON. tion being a field which needs to be investi- 
gated, some experiments along this line were 
instituted. In 1908, we secured a yield of AA^heat of tAventy- 
six bushels with winter irrigation only, as against eight 
bushels wdth no irrigation, and twenty-seven bushels with 



38 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

three summer irrigations. Late fall irrigation of alfalfa 
proved ver,y beneficial. The plat so treated, yielding at the 
rate of 2.82 tons the first cutting, and 6.7 tons for the sea- 
son, Avhile the plat not irrigated in the fall yielded 1.74 
tons the first cutting and 4.96 for the season. Both plats 
were irrigated alike in summer. Late fall irrigation of 
alfalfa can thus be recommended in connection with sum- 
mer irrigation. Where water is available during fall and 
w^inter, there appears to be a great opportunity for irriga- 
tion out of the growing season, either alone or in connection 
with summer irrigation. 

On summer fallowed land the yield of 
DRY FARMING, wheat was three times as great as on land 

cropped everj year. A yield of seven bush- 
els of wheat per acre, machine measure, Avas secured with 
dry farming in 1908, Avhile farmers elsewhere on similar 
soil in our locality, secured but one-third of a bushel of rye. 
On the station farm the same year^ oats yielded eleven 
bushels per acre and barley six bushels. Yields of wheat 
and other small grain, twice as large as those above men- 
tioned Avere secured on small plats and on the best land. 

In connection Avitli the experiments in ir- 
soiL MOISTURE rigation, inquiries into the moisture con- 
INVESTIGATIONS. ditions of the soil to a depth of three feet 

Avere undertaken. Actual determina- 
tions of soil moisture contents were made and data secured 
with regard to the depth of percolation, the amount of Ava- 
ter that the soil is capable of absorbing and the amount of 
irrigation Avater that becomes available to crops. These 
investigations liave been conducted because a full under- 
standing of all the conditions, it is believed, are necessary 
for intelligent ii-rigation of crops. 



OF THE UxNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 39 

Many kinds of wheat are being tested and the 
VARIETY station chemist, Professor Jones, of Moscow, is 
TESTING, making analysis to determine in a preliminary 
way, their value for flonr. Complete milling 
tests are being made of some wheats grown under various 
conditions. Varieties of other small grain and miscel- 
laneous crops such as dwarf milo, non-saccharine sor- 
ghums, field peas, and corn are also being tested. 

Records of evaporation and of rainfall 

MISCELLANEOUS havc been kept ever since the inception 

RECORDS. of the auxiliary station, as these data 

are necessary to the other investiga- 
tions. An accurate account of the cost of pumping water 
for two seasons are in the possession of the station. 

In connection with and as a result of the inves- 
PERSONAJ. tigations of the auxiliary station, a bulletin on 
WORK. dry farming and a report of the first season's 
work has been prepared by the superintendent 
and printed. A report on the second year's work is now 
in course of preparation. Various articles published in the 
Gem State Rural, and newspapers of the State have added 
to the agricultural value of the station. The superinten- 
dent, who is also irrigationist of the Idaho Experiment Sta- 
tion, has been active in farmers' institute work, advising 
farmers relative to practical irrigation and dry farming. 
The numerous letters received by the superintendent ask- 
ing for information and advice indicates the usefulness of 
the Southern Idaho station. 

Such problems connected with irrigation, 

OUTLINE OF dry farming, and cultivation as are perti- 

FUTURE AVORK. ncut will be taken up from time to time 

and an endeavor made to solve them. The 
following are the plans for 1909 : 



40 REPORT OF THK KE(rl<:XTS 

The tests of winter Irrigation are being con- 
wiNTER tinned for fnrther A^erification. The good re- 
IRRIGATION snlts secured in 1908 has indicated the advisa- 
bility of snch work. Some alfalfa was irri- 
gated in the fall of 1908, and a plat left nnirrigated for a 
check. Certain plats were irrigated at the same time for 
spring planting of wheat and potatoes. Ground adjoining, 
not so irrigated Avill be used for check plats planted to the 
same crops. In this way the effect of winter irrigation will 
be thoroughly tested and compared with summer irriga- 
tion. 

Experiments to determine the proper amount of 
DUTY OF Avater for Avheat and potatoes Avill be instituted. 
WATER. Different amounts of Avater ranging from an ex- 
cessiA^e to an insufficient amount Avill be applied 
on different plats. The behaAdor of the crop AA'ill be noted 
and the yield Avith different amounts aahII be ascertained. 
In the instance of the Avheat, the quality of the Avheat both 
as shoAA^n by the general appearance of the grain sample, 
and bA' chemical anah'sis AA'ill be determined. 

An inquiry into the effect of the time of 

EFFECT OF TIME Summer irrigation as regards the stage 

IRRIGATION. of growth of the crop will be instituted. 

In 1909, Avheat aa^II be used for this ex- 
periment wliich is being planned and Avill be so conducted 
as to d(^termine the time or times Avhen irrigation may be 
of most benefit. 

EA^ery year cropping and alternate year 
DRY FARMING, cropping will be compared. During the 

season of 1908, twenty acres of land Avere 
smniiier fallowed. This land is being used for experiments 
as follows : 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 41 

1. Depth of plowing. 

2. Comparative value of winter and spring Avheat. 

3. Effect of harrowing wheat. 

4. Effect of sub-surface packing 

5. Testing of various crops such as barley, oats, corn, 
potatoes and peas. 

Various varieties of different crops will be 
VARIETY tested on irrigated and dry land. Considerable 
TESTING, space will be devoted to wheat. The seed of val- 
uable varieties will be increased and kept clean. 

THE ADMINI,^TRATfON BUILDING, 

On March 29th, 1907, the plans for the Administration 
Buildino' were examined bv the board and some alterations 
ordered. On May 2nd advertisements for bids on the six 
separate proposals prepared by the architect were issued, 
and the bids received were opened by the board June 11th. 
Messrs. Hastie & Dougan, Spokane; M. C. Murphy, Spo- 
kane, and the Campbell Building Company of Salt Lake, 
rendered bids on five of the proposals specified. On June 
12th the board rejected all the bids and returned the cer- 
tified checks to the bidders. On June 13th the plans of 
the architect were again revised and alterations ordered 
to be completed by July 15th. New advertisements for 
bids were issued and the bids received were opened by 
the board August 20th. General bids were received from 
A. S. Whiteway & Co., Boise; The Campbell Building 
Company, Salt Lake; Hastie & Dougan, Spokane; M. C. 
Murphy, Spokane; John P. Huetter, Spokane, and bids on 
particular portions of the work from F. D. Booth, Lewis- 
ton; The Minnesota Steel and Machinery Company, Min- 
neapolis; Collins & Walker, Lewiston; C. M. Benson, Lew- 



42 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

iston; P. J. Kinne}^, Boise; George H. Sutherland, Walla 
Walla; John F. Corney, American Falls; James Smythe 
Plumbing Co., Spokane, and Nels Peterson, Moscow. On 
August 21st all general bids were rejected and their ac- 
companying checks returned, and later all bids on special 
portions of the work were similarly rejected. On August 
23rd general bids were received from A. S. Whiteway & 
Co., Boise; M. C. Murphy, Spokane; The Campbell Build- 
ing Co., Salt Lake, and particular bids from The Washing- 
ton Brick and Lime Co., Spokane; John P. Huetter, Spo- 
kane; Wm. Brown, Spokane; Robert Russell, Spokane. 
On August 24th, 1907, the bid of A. S. Whiteway & Co., 
of Boise, for the erection of the central portion of the 
Administration Building, omitting the furnishing of the 
third floor, for the sum of |1 62,817.00 was accepted, and 
the president and secretary of the board were authorized 
to sign a contract with WhitcAvay & Co. ; the contractors, 
to furnish a bond of |55,000.00, to be approved by the At- 
torney General of the State of Idaho and the President of 
the Board of Regents, and the building to be completed 
by December 31st, 1908, with stipulated damages of |50.00 
per diem for overtime. The work on the building has pro- 
ceeded from the date of the signing of the contract and 
the filing of the bond to the present time and the brick 
and stone and steel work is practically completed. Owing 
chiefly to the fact that, in the opinion of the Regents, 
building operations during the building season of 1908 
were not pressed with sufficient vigor the building is not 
completed at the writing of this report and in all proba- 
bility will not be completed for several months. State- 
ments of warrants issued to Whiteway & Co. and the arch- 
itect's estimates will b(^ found iu the financial exhibits ac- 
comjKiiiiDg this rej)ort. 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 43 

MINOR PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

A small flour mill with a basement^ designed for inves- 
tigation in fruit by-products, has been built and equipped 
for experimental Avork. These facilities will aid very ma- 
terially in the efficiency of the station work, in studying 
wheat improvement and in solving some of the problems 
in the manufacture of fruit products. 

A forge shop has been recently added to the equipment 
of the Mechanical Engineering Department. Eight Buffa- 
lo down-draft forges with power blower and exhauster 
has been installed, together with an emery wheel grinder 
and the necessary small tools, vises, mandrels, etc. This 
equipment is temporarily installed in a 30x34 wooden 
building. 

The kitchen in Ridenbaugh Hall has been enlarged and 
a cold storage room provided. The building formerly oc- 
cupied by the AgTicultural Department has been re- 
modelled and six practice rooms, a lecture room and an 
office provided for the Department of Music. 

The green house, 50x18, has been reconstructed and 
rebuilt on a site directly west of the flour mill. 

A rifle target has been built on the north slope of the 
hill that flanks the gymnasium. 

All the expense of the city Council and Hose Company 
No. 4, a brick hose house is being constructed at an easy 
distance from the chief University buildings. The stable 
has been moved to a new location on the county road. 

INVENTORY OF INSURANCE. 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 

Date, December 13, 1908. 

Name of Insurance Insurance Total 

Building. on Building-. on Contents. Insurance 

Engineering Hall $20,000 00 $15,000 00 $35,000 00 

Ridenbaugh Hall 20,000 00 3,500 00 23,500 00 

Armory and Gymnasium 20,000 00 5,039 00 25,039 00 

Annex Building 250 00 1,500 00 1,750 00 



44 REPORT OF THE KE<JEXTS 

Liszt Hall 2,500 00 1,000 00 3,500 00 

Assay Building- 12,500 00 5,000 00 17,500 00 

Metallurg-ical Building 15,000 00 15,000 00 

Morrill Hall 35,000 00 21,000 00 56,000 00 

Farm House 600 00 600 00 

Farm Barn 1,500 00 500 00 2,000 00 

Campus Barn . 500 00 and contents 500 00 

Forge Shop 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Experimental Mill 600 00 1,600 00 2,200 00 



Total $129,450 00 $54,139 00 $183,589 00 

INVENTORY. 

June 30, 1908. 

Agriculture $ 7,701 30 

Agronomy , 349 35 

Agricultural Chemistry 4,250 03 

Biology 2,440 50 

Chemistry 6.098 98 

Civil Engineering 5,814 22 

Dair^v'ing 1,088 45 

Domestic Science and Art 1,35 5 32 

Dormitory 3,460 45 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineering 13,110 28 

Experiment Station Library 362 55 

Geology 2,050 47 

Gymnasium 2,472 49 

Horticulture 1,964 17 

History 38 50 

Library 19,133 80 

Military 38 00 

Mining " 7,323 10 

Music 1.6 3 7 00 

Offices — 

President 178 00 

Dean 242 60 

Principal 75 40 

Bursar 1,090 30 

Physics 3.5 26 12 

Plant Pathology 1,171 35 

School Rooms 2,514 00 

Stable 396 00 

STATE APPROPRIATIONS. 

Tear. Maintenance. Building. 

1889 $15,000 00 1/2 -mill levy. Building Fund. 

1891 % -mill levy, Building Fund. 

1893 2,000 00 %-mill levy. Building Fund, including 

1895 18.246 00 year 1895. 

1897 17,969 14 

1899 20,000 00 $ 14,000 Improvement Fund. 

1901 22,000 00 50.000 Building Fund, 

1903 50,000 00 43,000 Building and Imp. Fund. 

1905 26,500 00 40,000 Metallurgical Laboratory, 

And Interest funds. 

1907 28,300 00 150.000 Administration Biiilding. 

And interest funds. 20,000 Permanent Improvements. 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 45 

THE LIBRARY, 

The library is open Monday to Friday from 8 a. 
HOURS, m. to 5 p. m. Saturday, from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. 

During the Christmas vacation it is open three 
hours daily and in summer not less than four hours per 
week. 

It is a cause for deep-felt gratitude on the 
BOOK FUNDS, part of all persons interested in the welfare 

of the University that the library has so 
rapidly regained working efficiency. On the morning after 
the fire when the library lay in ashes in the ruins of the 
Administration Building the University possessed in all 
738 books that had escaped destruction because loaned to 
departments housed in other buildings than the one con- 
sumed. On December 1st, 1906, the librarian reported 
2,900 volumes exclusive of public documents. December, 
1908, finds the number grown to 6,067, with 2,500 volumes 
ordered but not yet received from the publishers. Thus 
during the biennium of this report the library has in- 
creased three-fold, and has been acquired as follows: 

Volumes. 

Not destroyed by fire 738 

Purchased with library funds 2,931 

Purchased with gift funds , 1,120 

Gifts 1,112 

Bound periodicals 166 

Total 6 067 

Additions purchased 2,500 

The |9,000 appropriated for the library by the Legisla- 
ture in 1907 has been expended in the following manner 
under the direction of the library committee of the faculty 
after careful consideration of the varying dependence of 
the different departments on library facilities and the 
number of students to be benefitted in each. 



46 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

Binding, |400 ; freight, |975 ; general liter- 

GENERAL LI- ature, flOO; periodical subscriptions, 

BRARY FUNDS. |600 ; reference, |875; special needs, |525. 

Agriculture, f300; Biology, $250; Chemis- 
DEPARTMENTS. try, |225 ; Civil Engineering, $365; Do- 
mestic Art, f40; Domestic Science, |50; 
Economics, |250; Education, |215; French, Spanish and 
Italian, |300; Geology, |125; German, $250; Health, $25; 
History, $650 ; Latin and Greek, $375 ; Mathematics, $85 ; 
Mechanical Engineering, $125; Mining, $125; Metallurgy, 
$125; Military, $10; Music, $100; Philosophy and Psy- 
chology, $210; Physics, $225; Preparatory, $175; Public 
Speaking and Debate, $200; Sociology, $25. Total, 
$9,000. 

All the books thus acquired have been selected by the 
heads of departments as the most valuable of the new 
publications and the standard authorities in their several 
lines, and every book adds to the working value of the li- 
brary. There is no dead material. Every dollar appro- 
priated is bringing in its expected returns through the 
<lail3^ use by the students of the intellectual tools it has 
])urchased. 

The increased use of the library facilities by the stu- 
dents is a cause for further congratulation. No accurate 
record of the use of books in the reading room can be kept 
as students an<l faculty mc^mbers have free access to the 
shelves and use the books they want, but the increased use 
of the library is very noticeable. In loans to students of 
books for home use there was during the year 1907-1908 
a gain of 33 per cent, and the period from September 15th 
to December 1st of this year shows a still greater propor- 
tionate increase. 



OF TIIF> UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 47 

A university, from the fact that it offers an intensive 
education, must emphasize research work. The student 
has a permanent grip on problems he works out for him- 
self by this method, under direction, whereas the same ma- 
terial acquired from the instructor without personal ef- 
fort would be soon lost. Rooks are indispensable for re- 
search. The library is the only laboratory for the Depart- 
ments of History, Political Science, Sociology, English, 
Classics, Modern Languages and Pedagogy. An increase 
in the number of courses offered in the regular depart- 
ments, together with departments newly created in which 
the entire apparatus of study consists, not in mechanical 
equipment, but in books alone, increases the present need 
for additions. As soon as the general text-books are master- 
ed the technical and specialized authorities become neces- 
sary for further study, and these are higher in price and 
demand a larger money outlay in acquiring any given 
number of them. The quantity of new and valuable works 
now published annually in CA^ery department of letters, 
science and industrial education exceeds that produced in 
any former period, and if new material from this vast 
stream is not selected any branch so limited will in five 
years be notably out of date. 

All this bears directlv on the success or failure of the 
State University in fitting the young people of Idaho for 
lives of highest usefulness in the commonwealth. This is 
true of private individuals; it is more true of the army 
of teachers in all grades of the State school system who 
go out from the University and sow the principles there 
learned broadcast across the State to yield their harvest 
in the coming generation. The prevalent ideals of civic 
duty and social safety will be standardized by the teaching 



48 REPORT OF THE REGENTS 

at the University much as the clocks of the nation are 
regulated by the time of the National Observatory. This 
requires that the ripest, richest thought of the ablest 
statesmen, social leaders and scientists be available at the 
University library in a steady stream of the best new 
books. 

Because of the careful selection of all books purchased 
in the last three years the University library is unques- 
tionably the best in Idaho on the subjects represented. 
For the future this leading position should be permanently 
maintained, so that the students and investigators of the 
State will be able to find at the University the authorita- 
tive literature covering the fields in which they are work- 
ing. Within the University itself the instructors can not 
work at their highest efficiency without the opportunity 
of frequent research investigation. Thus this institution, 
at the head of the State educational system presents as its 
fundamental need a steadily growing library. To this end 
an appropriation of |10,000.00 for the purchase of books 
is asked for the coming biennium. 

The crowding of the reading room daily to 
ROOMS AND the utmost limit, which is the natural result 
FURNITURE, of the increased student enrollment, causes 

those in charge of this department to antici- 
pate the transfer to new quarters in the Administration 
Building next year with great relief. The new rooms will 
require fittings and furniture, but because they will also 
be outgrown within a few years the equipment now pur- 
chased sliould be of such nature that it can be transferred 
later to a j^ermanent library building. Fire-proof steel 
shelving witli interchangeable shelves; hardwood furni- 
ture, not easily marred, consisting of at least twelve read- 



OF THE UXIVEKSITV OF IDAHO. 49 

ing tables and one hundred and fifty comfortable chairs; 
and a cork carpet, as easily cleaned as wood or stone and 
desirable because noiseless, are recommended. The cost 
of such furniture and fittings would be about |4,000.00. 

SCHOOL OF LAW, 

During the last year the authorities of the University 
have had under consideration the establishment of a 
School of Law. The University was originally organized 
in pursuance of an act passed by the Fifteenth Territorial 
Legislature, on January 30th^ 1889. Among other things 
the charter provides: "The object of the University ot 
Idaho, shall be to provide the means of acquiring a thor- 
ough knowledge of the various branches of learning con- 
nected with the scientific, industrial and professional pur- 
suits, and to this end it shall consist of the following col- 
leges or departments, to wit : 

First. The college or department of arts. 

Second. The college or department of letters. 

Third. The professional or other colleges or depart- 
ments that mav from time to time be added thereto or con- 
nee ted therewith." 

The Kegents and Faculty are of the opinion that the 
period has arrived for the establishment of a Law School. 
Our State is making rapid strides in the development of 
her great resources. Her irrigation schemes, under the 
direction of the National Government, and also of the 
State, are attracting the attention of the entire nation. 
Population has been widely secured on such account. Her 
mining resources, although in their infancy, are known 
the world over. Her lead out-put is one-fourth that of the 
United States. 



50 REPORT OF THE Rj:(;i<:xTS 

Men of abilit}^ and experience and with a general legal 
training, are imperatiA^ely required in our Legislature, and 
nowhere are the services of legally trained men more in de- 
mand. We are travel in<? from the Saxon toward the Ro- 
man idea, when the Court becomes both the law-maker 
and the judge. 

Tlie complexity of modern affairs, the growth of our 
statute and judge-made law, and the industrial and social 
complications arising out of the advanced civilization of 
this generation, demand for their guidance and solution, 
minds enriched by a knowledge of the history and a com- 
prehension of the philosophy of the law, and trained in 
the science of legislation and jurisprudence. No agency is 
so well equipped to perform this important labor as the 
State itself; and to no agency is it so important that the 
Avork not onlv be done, but that it be done well. 

The framers of our Constitution declared, in most un- 
equivocal language, that the stability of our form of gov- 
ernment depends upon the intelligence of the people, and 
long before the formation of that instrument the general 
government had anticipated the needs of the State to be 
created, in the matter of higher education, by a munificent 
donation of public lands to aid in the installation of a 
State University. From the earliest times, the law has 
been at once the intellectual attraction and the stepping 
stone to future success and civic usefulness, of the most 
brilliant and capacious of mental abilities, and the his- 
tory of all other communities is repeating itself in Idaho. 

Each semester, during the last collegiate ,year, young 
men have aj)plied at various law offices in Moscow for po- 
sitions with lawycTs, in order that they might acquire 
sonio knowledge of the law in addition to their regular 



OF THE UNIVEHSITY OP IDAHO. 51 

college work. Failing to obtain proper legal training in 
our State, they must seek it elsewhere. 

The University has already taken high rank among the 
best educational institutions of the United States. It is 
confidently expected that she will maintain the same rank 
in the installation and conduct of professional schools. 
The proposed field for the operations of a law school is 
practically unoccupied, and in every sense inviting. There 
is now no law school of importance nearer than Denver 
on the east, and Portland or Seattle, on the west. 

The Supreme Court of our State, and also the Federal 
Courts in Idaho, have rendered able and far-reaching de- 
cisions in all departments of the law. These decisions, 
treating the most important subjects, can be used as texts, 
with illustrative readings, and should be taught in our 
University, and thus educate our students in the growth 
and development of legal principles, under Idaho environ- 
ments and on Idaho soil. 

A law school will furnish a criterion for admission to 
the bar, and assist the courts and the Legislature in re- 
quiring and enforcing an advanced standard of qualifica- 
tions for such admission. In view of these and other con- 
siderations the Regents believe themselves justified in tak- 
ing the step contemplated, by the establishment of a law 
school, and that such action will meet the approval of the 
people of the St^te. 

Both English and American History verify the state- 
ment that the law is looked upon as the open door to politi- 
cal preferment. At the present day it is almost as much 
so in the business world, and business men have found out 
the exceeding value of legal training as a preparation for 
a business career. More than six hundred years ago, Brae- 



52 REiFOKT OF THE REGENTS 

ton, an eminent law writer, said : ^^The utility of a study 
of the law also is that it ennobles the learners, and it dou- 
bles their honors and their profits, and makes them to be 
promoted in the realm, and to sit in the King's hall, and 
in the seat of the King himself." 

The democratic spirit of the modern State University 
develops in its alumni, the desire to be useful in the of- 
ficial life of the State, rather than the pursuit of office for 
the gratification of selfish ambition, and the habit of mind 
which regards great abilities and culture as possessions 
held in trust for the benefit of the State and the people. 

Without enlarging further on the subject, it is respect- 
fully submitted for the consideration of the Governor and 
the Legislature. 

THE NEEDS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

It has been the constant aim of the Regents to increase 
the efficiency of the University and its usefulness to the 
State, believing that this is where their duty to the State 
pointed. In doing this the standard of the University in 
the number and completeness of courses offered, in the lat- 
itude of elective studies available for students, and in the 
high standing and ability of its faculty and teaching force, 
has been raised to the highest possible level. This has been 
carried to such an extent that two distinctly new features 
have been added that are not found in similar institutions 
in the West, e. g., the health and physical training depart- 
ment and a course of law lectures covering all branches of 
State laws of Idaho, mention of which have been made else- 
where in this report. This strengthening of the courses of 
study and teaching force has naturally attracted a large 
increase in attendance in the last biennial period. This 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 53 

is very gratifying to the Regents, and will no doubt be 
equally so to the people of Idaho. It has, however, devel- 
oped a weakness in the equipment of the University for 
accommodation of students that has carried great con- 
cern. This weakness we deem it our duty to lay before the 
Legislature. The Regents realize that it will be impossible 
for the State to supply all its rapidly growing institutions 
with all things that could be profitably used and, so, in 
stating the needs of the University have endeavored to 
confine their requests to the actual needs of the institu- 
tion. 

The Administration building, provision for a portion of 
which was made by the Ninth Session, should be completed 
as soon as possible. Plans for the uncompleted portions 
of the buildings include an assembly hall for students, 
small lecture and societies' room, young ladies' rest, study 
and lavatory rooms, music or domestic science rooms, Y. 
M. C. A. and Y. W. C A. rooms and rooms for the Prepara- 
tory School. There are no rooms for these several pur- 
poses at present and improvised substitutes have to be 
used to the detriment of other branches of the University. 

The entire dormitory capacity of the University pro- 
vides room for only forty young ladies or fifty by crowd- 
ing. We have no boys' dormitory. There are over seventy 
non-resident young ladies now in attendance at the Uni- 
versity who have no accommodations in the dormitory. 
Provision should be made for these at once. Additional 
dormitory room should also be made for future growth. 
The buildings provided by the State for students' living 
rooms should be built of fire proof construction, so no 
danger to life by fire may possibly exist. 

The present University buildings are all heated with 



54 REPORT OF THE REOENTS 

one exception by individual heating plants. In arranging 
for heating the Administration Building the Regents deem 
it wise in the interest of economy and efficiency, to pro- 
vide a central heating plant and connect all the University 
buildings up to it as fast as possible. This will save con- 
siderable in fuel and janitor hire over present arrange- 
ments and be more efficient. The Legislature will be 
asked to provide for this. 

The University has no machinery building at present. 
The iron and wood working and electrical machinery are 
at present installed on the first and second floors of the old 
"School of Mines Building." They are placed as near the 
walls as possible but even in this position the vibration 
caused in running them is having a very bad effect on the 
building, and will damage it seriously if not removed soon. 
A one-story building should be provided for all heavy ma- 
chinery, and it should be placed on concrete foundations. 

Provision has been made in that portion of the Adminis- 
tration Building now nearing completion for housing the 
University library. This building is of fire proof construc- 
tion and the Regents deem it best to provide the library 
room with steel furnishings, and will ask the appropria- 
tion of the minimum amount with which this can be ac- 
complished. For furnishing the balance of the Adminis- 
tration Building an estimate will be made and appropria- 
tion based on this estimate will be asked. 

For library books an appropriation will be asked suf- 
ficient to supply each division or department of the Uni- 
v(irsity with from |25.00 to $200.00 per annum to pur- 
cIiiLse i)()()ks and i>eriodicals, this being deemed the least 
ainonnt that would keep these departments abreast of the 
times. 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. . 0'^ 

An appropriation for a boys' dormitory will not be 
asked at this time, but the Regents would like and will 
ask for an appropriation for building and equiping a boys^ 
dining hall in the vicinity of the University. If this is 
provided as a nucleus, it is hoped private capital will pro- 
vide lodging accommodations for the students in that vi- 
cinity, and the necessity for the State to provide a boys' 
dormitory will be avoided for a number of years. 

The IMaintenance of the University so far as the State 
is concerned, is provided for by the interest of the Univer- 
sity funds, the rental of the lands, and by direct appropri- 
ation. There will probably be a steady increase in the 
amount derived from the first two sources, but the growth 
of the University in numbers and the high standard of the 
teaching force and the increase in general running ex- 
penses, will compel the Regents to ask for an increased ap- 
propriation from the State. 

In the Department of Agriculture great strides are be- 
ing made. The influence of this department is needed and 
should be given to all sections of the State. That it may 
be so given and be of the utmost possible benefit to all 
parts of the State appropriations will be asked for im- 
provements and for carrying on the work in the following 
ways: For further improvements on the permanent sta- 
tion at Caldwell; for working laboratories for the depart- 
ments of Horticulture and Agronomy at Moscow; for the 
purchase of individual types of different breeds of stock 
in the lines of cattle, horses, sheep, swine and jpoultry, and 
for suitable buildings for housing them at Moscow; for 
the extension of the farmers' institute work and for carry- 
ing on University extension work in Agriculture whereby 
short courses in these studies can be given in different 
parts of the State; for carrying on the experiment station 



56 REPORT OF TIIK RWiEXTS 

work at Caldwell and also at three other stations which 
the Kegents expect to establish in other parts of the State. 
The latter work has been paid for largely by the U. S. Gov- 
ernment funds heretofore. The officers in charge of these 
funds have within the last two years decided to withhold 
the support, however, unless the several States are inter- 
ested to such an extent as to share the expenses. It is 
hoped Idaho will join with them. 

The Regents think the time has arrived for establishing 
a law school in connection with the University. At pres- 
ent a student wishinir to attend a law school must leave 
the State for this purpose. Enough interest has been 
shown in the matter to assure the school an adequate en- 
rollment from the start. An appropriation for buying a 
law library and for maintenance will be asked. 

The appronriation made by the last two sessions of the 
Leo-islature for Kecents' expenses has been too small. The 
fund provided has been exhausted and other funds hnve 
had to be drawn on to meet the deficiencv in both cases. 
■Roo-onts serve without pav and more of their time is re- 
quired each year as the institution gtows. Ample pro- 
vision should be mnde for their actual expenses. An in- 
creased amount will be asked for this purpose at this ses- 
sion. 

A small amount will be needed for ffradinjx the cfrounds 
nroiind the .\dministration building after its completion. 

FTNA NOT A L EXTTTBTTSf. 

The followincr exhibits of receipts and disbursements 
i-cproscnt the main divisiotis of the Fniversity's funds for 
1007-S: (1) The V. S. Government Morrill Fund. (2) 
The IT. S. Government Hatch Fund. (8) The IT. S. Gov- 
(Tnment Ad;ims' Fund. (4) The Local Station Fund. (5) 
The State Maintenance Funds. (6) The IT. of I. Rebuild- 



OP THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 



57 



injr Fund and the U. of I. Rebuilding and Equipment 
Fund. (7) The Insurance Fund. (8) The Local Main- 
tenance Fund. 

Accounts included in the last report and closed out dur- 
ing the biennium are placed with the list of warrants in 
the appeudix, as follows : The Improvement Fund, 1903, 
the State Improvement Fund, 1905, for the purchase of 
books for the library, the Bond Indemnity Fund, and the 
U. of I. Improvement Fund, 1905, for the erection of a 
Metallurgical Building. A small balance remains in the 
last mentioned fund. 

U. S. MORRILL FUND. 
(July 1, 1900- June 30, 1907.) 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand July 1, 1906 $ 2 5 00 

To Morrill installment for 1906-7 25,000 00 

Total available for year ending June 30, 1907 $25,025 00 

Disburseiiients. 
(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Agriculture $ 550 00 

By Mechanic Arts 6,083 99 

By Eng-lish Language 3,841 65 

By Mathematical Science 4,133 32 

By Natural or Physical Science 6,549 37 

By Economic Science 3,866 67 

Total expended during year $25,025 00 

U. S. MORRILL FUND. 
(July 1, 1907- June 30, 1908.) 

KeceiptvS. 

To Morrill installment for 1907-08 $30,000 00 

Total available for the year ending June 30, 1908 $30,000 00 

Disbursements. 
(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Agriculture $ 673 65 

By Mechanic Arts 8,36 9 76 

By English Language 3,900 00 

By Mathematical Science 2,900 00 

By Natural or Physical Science 9,112 14 

By Economic Science 3,608 31 

Total expended during year $28,763 86 

Balance remaining unexpended July 1, 1908 (with accounts 

to cover) 1,236 14 

$30,000 00 



58 REPORT OF thp: regents 

U. S. HATCH FUND. 
(July 1, ll)()(;-.Juno 30, 1007.) 

Receipts. 

To Hatch installment for 1906-7 $15,000 00 

Disbiirseinents. 

(As per abscti-act of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 6,608 22 

By Labor 2,976 63 

By Publications 1,607 2.5 

By Postage and Stationery 2 42 28 

By Freight and Express 184 92 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 515 36 

By Chemical Supplies 134 02 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 759 92 

By Fertilizers 76 43 

By Feeding Stuffs 215 12 

By Library 30 07 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 73 44 

By Furniture and Fixtures 88 12 

By Scientific Apparatus 1 07 

By Live Stock 341 05 

By Traveling Expenses 674 18 

By Contingent Expenses 15 00 

By Buildings and Land 456 92 



Total $15,000 00 

u. kS. hatch fund. 

(July 1, 1907- Jime 30, 1008.) 

Kecelpts. 

To Hatch installment for 1907-8 $15,000 00 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 6,517 23 

By Labor 3,286 05 

By Publications 722 57 

By Postage and Stationery 236 37 

By Freight and Express 312 59 

By Heat, Light, Water and Power 621 18 

By Chemical Supplies 1,094 10 

By Feeding Stuffs 475 90 

By Library 155 61 

By Tools, Implements and Machinery 74 50 

By Furniture and Fixtures 149 32 

By Live Stock ■ 249 53 

By Traveling Expenses 291 70 

By Contingent Expenses 15 00 

By liuildings and Land 725 68 



Total $15,000 00 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 59 

V. S. ADAMS FUND. 
(July 1, 1900- June 30, 1907.) 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand June 30, 1906 $ 1,817 96 

To Adams Installment for 1906-7 5,182 04 



Total available for year ending June 30, 1907 $ 7,000 00 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 1,938 89 

By Labor 946 53 

By Postage and Stationery 15 50 

By Freight and Express 408 85 

By Chemical Supplies 112 65 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 551 76 

By Library 694 04 

By Tools, Implements, and Machinery 1,895 80 

By Scientific Apparatus 16 40 

By Traveling Expenses 83 35 

By Contingent Expenses 10 00 

By Buildings and Land . 326 23 



Total $ 7,000 00 



U. S. ADAMS FUND. 
(July 1, 1907- June 30, 1908.) 

Receipts. 

To Adams Installment for 1907-8 $ 9,000 00 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Salaries $ 2,800 00 

By Labor 1,6 9 9 91 

By Postage and Stationery 70 14 

By Freight and Express 119 21 

By Heat, Light, Water, and Power 152 25 

By Chemical Supplies 182 78 

By Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies 928 22 

By Library 12 3 5 6 

By Tools, Implements, and Machinery 1,447 77 

By Traveling Expenses 38 00 

By Buildings and Land 374 05 

By Balance 1,064 11 

Total ' $ 9,000 00 



60 REPORT OF THE RI<:<iENTS ' 

LOCAL STsLTIOX FUND. 
(July 1, lOOG-Jiine 30, 1907.) 

Receipts. 

Balance on Hand July 1. 1906 $ 243 46 

To Receipts from Farm Products 1,533 49 



Total % 1,776 95 

Disbursements. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Governnnent.) 

By Labor $ 227 65 

By Publications , 7 60 

By Postag-e and Telegrams 15 15 

By Freight and Express 39 33 

By Seeds, Plants, and Sundry Supplies 298 82 

By Electric Motor and Connections 90 43 

By Traveling' Expenses 6 85 

By Repairs 122 48 

By Land 581 96 

By Balance 386 68 



Total $ 1,776 95 

J.OCA L f^TATTOX FUXD. 
(July 1, 1907-.Tnno 80, 1908.) 

ReceiptvS. 

Balance on hand June 30, 1907 $ 386 68 

To Receipts from Farm Products 1,671 38 



Total > $ 2,058 06 

Overdraft 61 82 



$ 2,119 88 

Disbiirseinents. 

(As per abstract of report to U. S. Government.) 

By Labor $ 180 35 

I?y Publications 151 75 

By Freight and Express 151 5 

By Heat, Lig-ht, Wat( r and Power 2 20 

By Chemical Supplies 3 60 

By Seeds, Plants, and Sundry Supplies 563 94 

By Feedinar Stviffs 132 43 

By Tools, Implcmenf s aiul Machinery 351 30 

By Furniture and Fixtures 1 50 

By Traveling Expenses 25 30 

]^y Exhibit Expen.se 15 99 

By T'.uildings and Lnnd 540 02 

By Overdrrift .... 61 82 

Tr.lMl $ 2,119 88 



OF THH T^MVERSITV OF IDAHO. 61 

NT 1/1/ I AM OF STATIJ MAINTI^JNANCE FlJ\n,'=^. 
(Jauiiary 1, lOOT-DecoinlxM- 1, lOOcS.) 

Receipts. 

To Legislative Appropriation $27,100 00 

To Traveling Expenses of Regents 1,2 00 00 

To University Fund 31,192 11 

To School of Science Fund 19,513 23 

To Agricultural College Fund 9,545 89 



$88,551 23 

Disbursements. 

By Salaries $37,490 89 

By Printing Catalogues, Reports, Office and College Supplies 3,369 77 

By Fuel, Light, Water and Power 13,045 8 4 

By Traveling Expenses, Farmers' Institutes and Inspection 

of High Schools 2,484 65 

By Insurance 2,844 42 

By Building Supplies and Furniture and Fixtures 2,075 97 

By General Labor and Janitor Supplies 4,763 37 

By Scientific Laboratories, Supplies and Equipment 12,553 14 

By Library, Military and Musical Supplies 2,446 47 

By Freight, Express, Postage, Telephone and Telegraph, 

Litigation and Miscellaneous Fees 1,789 25 

Sy Labor ." 1,3 49 75 

By Horticulture, Grounds, Labor and Supplies 1,05 3 30 

By Regents' Traveling Expenses 1,200 00 

By Building Repairs 2,084 41 

$88,551 23 



62 REPORT OF THE REOEXI^S 

SUMMARY OF U. OF L RFBUILDING FUND, 1907. 

To Appropriation $50,000 00 

By Publishing- Notices and Lithographing 

Bonds $ 57 85 

By Administration Building Contract 48,419 55 

3y Architect and Supervision Fees 1,255 70 

By Superintendent oi Construction 83 35 

By Drain 6 00 

By Clock Supplies 7 06 

By Unexpended Balance 170 49 

$50,000 00 $50,000 00 



SUMMARY OF U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIP- 
MENT FUND, 1907. 

Disburse- Unexpended Appropria- 
ments. Balance. tion. 

For Rebuilding $25,595 56 $74,404 44 $100,000 00 

For the Purchase of Books for 

the Library 3,512 40 5,487 60 9,000 00 

For the Purchase and installing 
of Equipment and Machin- 
ery of Ore Mill 5,000 00 (Closed) 5,000 00 

For Testing Machine for Civil 

Engineering Department .... 1,500 00 (Closed) 1,500 00 

For Repairs to Buildings and 

Grading 740 54 259 46 1,000 00 

For Mounting and Placing Speci- 
mens Donated for Educa- 
tional Purposes 26 32 475 68 500 00 

For Permanent Improvements for 

Auxiliary Station at Caldwell 799 g7 2,200 13 3,000 00 

$37,374 69 $82,825 31 $120,000 00 



OF Till-: rXIVKKSITV OF IDAHO. 63 

SLMMAin or ni^^iu RsiJMHXTs or u. or j. in- 
surance ri Ni). 

Morrill Hall. • 

Sundry Labor. Brick Cleaning- and Teaming-. $ 2,567 77 

Lumber and Other Supplies 279 73 

Concrete Foundation Contract 1,492 25 

Grading 1,733 15 

Stone Foundation Conti'act 2,542 50 

Kxtra Plumbing- 437 69 

Plumbing Contract 5,164 00 

Notice for Bids 22 85 

Architect's Fee 1,805 25 

Freight and Express 82 42 

Contract on Superstructure 21,319 88 

Electric Supplies and Wiring 355 76 

Sewer and Drain 149 19 

Extra Masonry 56 50 

Paid account Colson & Son, Contract 2,557 25 

Carpenters, Lumber and Concrete 366 00 

Painting Second Floor, account Colson & Son 170 45 

Furnishing Third Floor 3.266 49 — $ 44.368 63 



Administration Biiildin"-. 

Biick Cleaning and Teaming $ 1,597 74 

Traveling and Consultation 22 4 40 

Tools, Hardware, Lumber, Etc. ... 740 76 

Advertisement 417 72 

Architect's Fee 6,326 57 

Freight 3,767 18 

Paid account Colson & Sons, Labor 946 61 

Foundation Contract Fund 10,950 00 

Cement 7,037 70 

Cut Stone 1,650 44 

Structural Iron 362 15 

Power and Motor Rent 109 43 

Covering Foundation 165 25 

Drain 70 96 

Paid account Architect 205 98 

Contract on Main Building 1,314 00 — 35,886 89 

Summary of Other Disbursements. 

Central Heating Station Site 1,200 00 

Auxiliary Station Fund Loan 2 59 45 

Library Fund Loan 233 2S 

Green House 32 00 

Unexpended Balance December 1, 1908 28,051 98 



$110,032 2? 



64 REPORT OF THE RFXIENTS 

RECAPITULATIOX OF U. OF L IX^WRANCE FUND. 

Disbursements. Receipts. 
To Insurance Received from Loss of Admin- 

IstrcHtion Building- . . : $106,500 00 

To Interest on Deposit at 2 per cent 350 00 

To Colson & Sons. Certified Check 550 00 

To J. A. MacLean, Cement Sacks 63950 

Return Loans, Library and Aux. St. Pds 492 7 3 

To 31,000 Brick @ $6.00 186 00 

To 188,000 Brick @ $6.00 1,128 00 

To 31,000 Brick @ $6.00 186 00 

By Disbursements Morrill Hall ..$ 44,368 63 

By Disbursement, Administration Building. . 35,886 89 
By Disbursement, U. of I. Insurance Fund. . . 1,724 73 
Unexpected Balance, December 1, 1908 28,051 98 



$110,032 23 $110,032 23 



OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 



65 



SUMMARY OF LOCAL MAINTENANCE FUND. 

(1907-8.) 

Receipts. 

Feb. 2, 1907 — Interest on balances $ 54 07 

Mar. 2, 1907 — Interest on balances 47 47 

Apr. 2, 1907 — Interest on balances 365 61 

Apr. 9, 1907 — W. L. Payne, treas. University Warrant No. 68 2,641 66 

May 1, 1907 — Interest on balances 40 49 

June 1, 1907 — Interest on balances 37 19 

July 1, 1907 — Interest on balances 28 11 

July 1, 1907 — Two per cent interest on $45,000 insurance ac- 
count June 30, 1906, to June, 30, 1907. . . . 225 00 
July 1, 1907 — Interest charged on overdraft, January, Feb- 
ruary and March, returned 190 

July 9, 1907 — Interest on independent school bonds 137 50 

July 31, 1907 — Interest on various funds 18 98 

Aug. 31, 1907 — Two per cent interest on various funds 57 51 

Sept. 30, 1907 — Two per cent interest on various funds 63 37 

Sept. 30, 1907 — Two per cent on $30,000, July to October . . . 150 00 

Oct. 23, 1907 — Deposit from Bursar's fund 741 43 

Nov. 14, 1907 — Interest on balances 56 09 

Dec. 14, 1907 — Interest on balances 45 08 

Dec. 31, 1907 — Interest on balances 161 59 

Jan. 9, 1908 — Interest on school bonds 137 50 

Feb., 1908 — Interest on balances 34 96 

Mar. 6, 1908 — Interest on balances 29 50 

Mar. 30, 1908 — Interest on balances 153 20 

Apr. 7, 1908 — Deposit from Bursar's fund 35 00 

Apr. 30, 1908 — Interest on balances 24 28 

May 22, 1908 — Deposit in local fund 382 92 

May 29, 1908 — Interest on balances 28 81 

June 15, 1908 — Interest on school bonds 137 50 

June 15, 1908 — Interest on insurance fund 125 00 

June 15, 1908 — Interest on balances 17 91 

July 31, 1908 — Interest on balances 46 08 

Aug. 31, 1908 — Interest on balances 73 73 

Sept. 30, 1908 — Interest on balances 190 21 

Oct. 31, 1908 — Interest on balances 67 6 7 

Total $ 6,357 32 

Disbursements. 

Liszt Hall $ 2,160 20 

Ridenbaugh Hall 1,436 59 

Land 1,013 50 

Fixtures 270 00 

Mining 16 95 

Transfer from State maintenance to local fund 382 92 

Regents' expenses 115 32 

Unexpended balance 961 84 

Total $ 6,357 32 



EXTRACT FROM WARRANT REGISTER 

t 

AND 

FINANCIAL APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX. 



STATE WARRANTS — STATE MAINTENANCE FUND. 

9767 George C. Parkinson, regent's expenses $ 25 10 

9768 James F. McCarthy, regent's expenses 69 05 

9769 Edward S. Sweet, regent's expenses 53 20 

9811 Eimer & Amend, supplies 4 66 

1267 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 165 

1268 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 4 25 

1269 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 4 20 

1270 Berenice Maynard, salary 45 00 

1271 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 5 13 

1272 David & Ely Co., sundry supplies 6 27 

1273 Mutual Subscription Agency, subscription 2 65 

1274 Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 10 45 

1275 G. H. Matthes, civil engineering equipment 20 00 

1276 Union Fuel & Ice Co., coal 54 52 

1277 Spencer Lens Co., mining supplies 4 81 

1278 C. M. Fassett, chemical supplies 2 40 

1279 Dennison Manufacturing Co., chemical supplies 90 

1280 Engineering News Publishing Co., books 30 00 

1281 The Engineering Magazine, subscription 5 00 

1282 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry supplies 26 60 

1283 American Chemical Company, subscription 5 10 

1284 H. T. French, traveling expenses 46 80 

1285 Elizabeth Ryan, traveling expenses 66 05 

1286 Tinius Olson & Co., civil engineering equipment, . . . 117 40 

1287 Moscow Printing & Publishing Company, stationery 58 35 

1288 Tor Van Pyk, salary 16 50 

1289 John Almquist, salary 55 00 

12 90 L J. Cogswell, salary 91 65 

1291 Rosa Forney, salary 83 35 

1292 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

1293 James A, MacLean, salary 300 00 

1294 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

1295 H. D. McChesney, salary 166 65 

1296 James Fogle, salary 60 00 

1297 H. L. Axtell, salary 100 00 

1298 W. H. Mason, salary 40 00 

1299 George Steunenberg, salary 40 00 

1300 Arthur McKinlay, salary 100 00 

1301 Belle Sweet, salary 66 65 

1302 R. S. Harris, salary 50 00 

13 03 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 20 00 

1304 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

1305 W. A. Zumhof, salary 75 00 

1417 Philip Soulen, traveling expenses 18 65 

1418 J. G. Eldridge, traveling expenses 18 65 

1419 First Trust Company, insurance 94 80 

1420 John Wiley & Sons, books 5 70 

1421 Arthur H. Thomas Company, chemistry supplies. ... 3 28 

1422 Moscow Hardware Company, sundry supplies 15 65 

142 3 Moscow Electric Light & Power Company, current 

and power 147 65 

1424 Ward Leonard Electric Company, electrical supplies 29 31 



APPENDIX 



111 



142 5 P. W. Braun Company, mining- supplies 767 

1426 Alexander N. Winchell, treas., dues 15 00 

1427 Idaho Post, printing- 26 00 

142 8 The U. S. Infantry Association, subscription 4 50 

1429 Eimer & Amend, chemistry supplies and equipment 330 50 

1430 E. H. Sargent & Co., chemistry supplies and equip. . 118 36 

1431 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Company, telephone 7 20 

1432 Springston Lumber Company, coal 663 81 

1433 Union Iron Works, sundry supplies 52 71 

1434 Bursar account, sundry labor, freight and supplies. , 445 94 

1435 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 15 50 

2327 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 70 05 

2328 Central Scientific Company, physics equipment 121 10 

232 9 Mrs. M. E. Young, domestic science, labor and sup- 
plies 10 46 

2330 Eimer & Amend, physics equipment 134 53 

2331 John W. Graham & Co., dean's office supplies 3 75 

2332 The Idaho Post, printing and stationery 651 45 

2333 Model Stables, cab hire 150 

2 334 University of Chicago Press, magazines. 150 

2335 Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover, maps 16 00 

2336 The Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 9 30 

23 37 Underwood Typewriter Company, agricultural office 

furniture 36 75 

2338 General Electrical Company, equipment 74 85 

2339 Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, biology equipment 13 89 

2340 Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., biology equipment 2 19 

2341 Bursar account, sundry labor, freight and express. . 382 18 

2342 Moscow Electric Light & Power Co., light and power 141 60 

2343 Eimer & Amend, chemistry equipment 285 37 

2344 Moscow Printing & Publishing Co., printing and 

stationery 52 40 

2345 David & Ely Co., military supplies 14 26 

2346 Moscow Electric Supply Co., equipment 10 55 

2347 Moscow Hardware Co., equipment 1 .50 

2348 Moscow Hardware Co., supplies 2 70 

2349 Keuffel & Esser Co., book 3 00 

2350 N. Williamson, supplies 2 28 

2351 Baker & Thompson, equipment 4 50 

2352 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., janitor equipment.... 1 95 

2353 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., supplies 9 13 

2354 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., supplies 6 40 

2355 First Trust Co., insurance 42 00 

2356 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing 4 35 

2357 W. M. Duthie, cord wood 87 00 

2358 McGraw Publishing Company, book 2 57 

2359 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., supplies 2 80 

2360 Foote Mineral Company, chemistry equipment 20 45 

2361 Portland Paper Box Company, geological supplies. . . 20 22 

2362 Hill Publishing Company, book 6 40 

236 3 Myron C. Clark Publishing Co., books 9 90 

2364 Tull & Gibbs, furniture 101 50 

2365 Union Iron Works 15 75 

2366 The City of Moscow, water rent 150 00 

2367 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 9 33 

2368 N. Williamson, miscellaneous expense 12 65 

2369 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

2370 Arthur McKinlay, salary 100 00 



IV 



APPENDIX 



2371 
2372 
2373 
2374 
2375 
2376 
2377 
2378 
2379 
2380 
2381 
2382 
2383 
2384 
2385 
2386 
2387 
2388 
2389 
2390 
2391 
2392 
2393 
2394 
2395 
2396 
2397 
2398 
2399 
2400 
2401 
2402 
2403 
2404 
2439 
2440 
3148 
3149 
3150 
3151 
3152 
3153 
3154 
3155 
3156 
3157 
3158 
3159 
3160 
3161 
3162 
3163 
3164 
316 5 
3166 
3167 
3168 
3169 



Tor Van Pyk, salary 

Electric Appliance Company, physics equipment .... 

Rosa Forney, salary 

Francis Jenkins, salary 

R, S. Harris, salary 

Belle Sweet, salary 

Carrie F. Thompson, salary 

George Steunenberg, salary 

H. L. Axtell, salary 

I. J. Cogswell, salary 

"W, A. Zumhof, salary 

James A. MacLean, salary 

J. G. Eldridge, salary 

Berenice Maynard, salary 

John Almquist, salary 

H. D. McChesney, salary 

James Fogle, salary 

R. Hodgins, sundry supplies 

A. C. McClurg & Co., books 

G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

Electric Appliance Co., physics equipment 

Rockwood Mfg. Co., electrical equipment 

Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., lumber 

W. M. Duthie, cord wood 

C. H. Stoelting Co., physics equipment 

J. S. Jones, traveling expenses 

John W. Graham & Co., dean's office supplies 

John D. Bloomfleld, insurance 

A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing and sundry supplies 

C. M. Fassett, mining supplies 

Northwestern School Furniture Co., equipment. . . . 

Tull & Gibbs, window shades 

H. C. Aosved, salary 

Bertha Ransom, salary 

Gem Printing Company, sundry printing 

Electro Chemical Publishing Co., book 

Clearwater Lime Company, mining supplies 

W. W. Baden, salary 

Remington Typewriter Co., library supplies 

D. Van Nostrand Co., books 

Bursar account, sundry labor, freight and postage. . 
Globe- Wernicke Company, dean's office equipment. 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., biology equipment 

Moscow Transfer Company, drayage 

Moscow Flour Mill, office supplies 

Bushong & Co., stationery 

C. M. Fassett, sundry supplies 

David & Ely Co., sundry supplies 

Peasley Transfer Company, drayage 

Union Fuel & Ice Company, coal 

Moscow Electric Light & Power Co., light and power 

Oxford University Press, pamphlets 

H. ('. Aosved, salary 

O. A. Benedict, salary 

Jamf'H A. MacLean, traveling expenses 

James A. MacLean, traveling expenses 

Bursar account, regent's expenses 



16 


50 


97 


10 


83 


35 


95 


85 


50 


00 


66 


65 


20 


00 


40 


00 


100 


00 


91 


65 


75 


00 


150 


00 


166 


65 


45 


00 


55 


00 


100 


00 


60 


00 


142 


55 


6 


18 


83 


59 




60 


8 


41 


29 


00 


96 


00 




75 


5 


50 


5 


30 


42 


00 


28 


35 


18 


25 


102 


16 


107 


00 


72 


00 


20 


00 


22 


40 




25 




50 


150 


00 


1 


28 


7 


12 


399 


85 


11 


26 


9 


05 


2 


66 


16 


50 


2 


00 


4 


00 


31 


90 


3 


65 


12 


50 


65 


81 


160 


67 


1 


53 


55 


33 


84 


00 


50 


60 


131 


20 


26 


40 



APPENDIX 



317 Ferguson & Canham, regent's expenses 

3264 John C. Moore corporation, printing and stationery 

3589 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 

3590 John Almquist, salary 

3591 Belle Sweet, salary 

3592 R. S. Harris, salary 

3593 Berenice Maynard, salary 

3594 George Steunenberg, salary 

3595 J. G. Eldridge, salary 

3596 Francis Jenkins, salary 

3597 E. M. Hulme, salary 

3598 Bertha Ransom, salary 

3599 W. A. Zumhof, salary 

3600 Tor Van Pyk, salary 

3601 I. J. Cogswell, salary 

3602 H. D. McChesney, salary 

3603 Rosa Forney, salary 

3604 H. L. Axtell, salary 

3605 James A. MacLean, salary 

3606 Arthur McKinlay, salary 

3607 Engineering News Publishing Co., books 

3608 D. Van Nostrand Co., books 

3609 R, Hodgins, sundry domestic science supplies 

3610 Empire Hardware Company, sundry supplies 

3611 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 

3612 Mrs. Joseph Aspray, salary 

3613 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 

3614 Weston Electrical Instrument Co., repairs 

3615 J. L. Bourn, domestic science supplies 

3616 George Creighton, sundry supplies 

3617 W. M. Duthie, cord wood 

3618 Portland Seed Co., seeds 

3619 E. H, Sargent & Co., chemical equipment 

3620 The Idaho Post, sundry printing and stationery .... 

3621 Springston Lumber Co., lumber 

3622 Denver Fire & Clay Co., mining equipment 

3623 Eimer «& Amend, chemistry equipment and supplies 

3624 Hagan .'fe Cushing, domestic science supplies. 

3625 Standard Oil Co., chemical supplies . . • . 

3626 E. M. Hulme, traveling expenses 

3627 Mrs. S. H. Hays, traveling expenses 

3628 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 

3629 Mary E. Young, domestic science supplies 

3630 David & Ely Co., sundry supplies 

3631 David & Ely Co., domestic science supplies 

3632 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry supplies 

3633 Crane Co., fire hydrant 

3634 V. H. Brown, tuning pianos 

3635 William Hunter, insurance 

3 636 A. P. Wilson, insurance 

37 5 8 Bertha Ransom, salary 

3 85 7 J. H. Horton, salary 

3858 H. C. Aosved, salary 

3859 Eimer & Amend, chemical equipment 

3860 Idaho Post, printing and stationery 

3861 Leeds Northrup Co., electrical equipment 

3862 A. L. Vrom.an & Son, electrical equipment and 

plumbing 



3 


00 


38 


30 


20 


00 


55 


00 


66 


65 


50 


00 


45 


00 


40 


00 


166 


65 


95 


85 


150 


00 


20 


00 


75 


00 


16 


50 


91 


65 


100 


00 


83 


35 


100 


00 


150 


00 


100 


00 


14 


21 


4 


19 


6 


65 


28 


15 


6 


40 


75 


00 


5 


13 


4 


67 


2 


25 


4 


81 


67 


50 


22 


30 


236 


05 


58 


00 


21 


00 


2 


10 


85 


64 


10 


45 


69 


90 


95 


15 


46 


90 


1 


60 


8 


70 


3 


65 


4 


70 


18 


30 


23 


60 


10 


00 


45 


00 


45 


00 


20 


00 


6.0 


00 


63 


67 


2 


15 


19. 


00 


95 


75 



2 75 



VI 



APPENDIX 



3863 Kathryn Truitt, Sec'y Carnegie Library, rental .... 22 7.5 

3864 Union Fuel & Ice Co., coal 296 80 

3865 Eimer & .^menci, chemistry supplies 26 69 

3866 Munn & Co., book 3 40 

3867 W. S. Morley, traveling expenses 125 95 

3868 William Gaertner & Co., physics equipment 461 42 

3869 Philip Soulen, traveling expenses 48 40 

3870 H. T. French traveling expenses 17 40 

3871 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 9 55 

3872 Mary E. Yo'-.np, domestic science supplies and labor 9 98 
38 73 Jones & Dillingham, shop supplies 30 91 

3874 Bai.i;5ch & Lomb Optical Co., biology equipment.,.. 226 25 

3875 Springton Lumber Co. lumber 21 00 

3876 University Fook Store, janitor supplies 45 00 

3S77 Moscow Transfer Co., drayage 33 75 

3878 F. "VV. Braun Co., mining equipment 5 03 

3879 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry supplies 22 12 

3880 Moscow Electric Light & Power Co., light and 

power 78 24 

3881 Owl Drug Store, stationery 6 15 

3882 Bii.shong & C:o.. dean's office supplies 46 90 

3883 C. M. Fassett. sundry supplies 5 00 

3884 David & Ely. sundry supplies 2 90 

3885 W. M. Duthie, cord w^ood 70 00 

3886 J. B. Lippincott Co., book 4 62 

3939 PI W. Wilson Co., book 3 50 

3942 Bursar Account, sundry labor, freight and express. . 567 89 

4233 H. L. Axtell, salary 100 00 

423 4 H. D. McChesney, salary 10000 

4235 Arthur McKinlay, salary . .' 100 00 

4236 Fi-ancis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

4237 T. J. Cogswell, salary 91 65 

4238 O. B. Edgett, salary 75 00 

4239 John Almquist, salary 55 00 

4240 R. S. Harris, salary 50 00 

4241 Berenice Maynard, salary 45 00 

42 42 George Steunenberg, salary 40 00 

4243 Carrie F. Thompson, salarj^ 20 00 

4244 Belle Sweet, salary 66.65 

4245 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

42 46 W. A. Zumhof, salary 75 00 

4247 James A. MacLean, salary 150 00 

4248 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

4249 T. R. Jones, salary 83 35 

4317 W. H. Mason, salary 25 00 

4320 T. R. Jones, salary 83 35 

4321 Bertha Ransom, salary 20 00 

4436 J. H. Horton, salary 66 00 

4 4.U Rrjsa Forney, salary 83 35 

4 438 Rosa Forney, salary 83 35 

4439 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

4440 Belle Sweet, salary 66 65 

4441 James A. MacLean, salary 150 00 

4442 H. L. Axtell, salary 100 00 

4443 H. D. McChesney, salary 33 35 

4444 W. A. Zumhof, salary 75 00 

4445 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

4446 John Almquist, salary 5,5 00 

4447 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 



APPENDIX 



Vll 



4448 Berenice Maynard, salary 45 00 

4449 George Steunenberg, salary 40 00 

4 45 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

4451 W. W. Baden, salary 150 00 

4452 O. B. Edgett, salary 75 00 

4453 I. J. Cogswell, salary 91 65 

4454 Arthur McKinlay, salary 100 00 

4455 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 20 00 

4 456 Grice & Son, sundry fixtures 13 80 

4457 Central Scientific Company, physics equipment 22 50 

4458 Zumhof & Collins, sundry, labor and supplies 10 35 

4459 Hill Publishing Co., books 5 60 

4460 Hill Publishing Co., books 6 40 

4461 William Gaertner & Co., physics equipment 12 60 

4462 Mining and Scientific Press, book 4 00 

4463 Electric Appliance Co., physics equipment 110 00 

4464 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 8 01 

4465 Engineering News Publishing Co., books 3 45 

4466. Globe-Wernicke Co., dean's office furniture 11 50 

4467 E. H. Sargent & Co., chemistry equipment 3 40 

4468 H. C. Aosved, salary 70 50 

4469 Bursar account, sundry labor, freight, etc 440 06 

4470 W. A. Lauder, sundry labor and supplies 153 35 

4471 The Idaho Post, printing 26 50 

4472 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 12 75 

4473 Rhodes Iron Works, sundry items 5 74 

4474 Macmillan Company, books 2 76 

4475 Chris. Anderson, lumber 4 10 

4476 Orr & Lockett Hardware Co 20 98 

4477 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 9 05 

4478 Moscow Commission Company, feed 9 35 

4479 W. S. Robbins, ice 5 10 

4480 Charles C. Swan, domestic science supplies 44 20 

4481 George Creighton, domestic science sundries 80 

4482 Eugene Deitzgen & Co., civ. eng. equipment 18 33 

4483 Joseph L. Hill, dues 1^00 

4484 M. E. Young, domestic science sundries 9 90 

4485 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundry hardware. ... 40 05 

4486 W. M. Duthie, cord wood 84 00 

4 487 H. C. Aosved, salary 5 7 00 

4488 Theo. Alteneder & Sons, civil engineering equipment 21 92 

4489 Madison Lumber Company, lumber 46 35 

4490 Keuffel & Esser Co., of N. Y., civil eng, equipment. . 55 81 

4491 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and 

power 83 97 

4561 T. R. Jones, salary . 33 35 

4798 Orr & Lockett Hardware Co., sundry hardware 66 71 

4871 Edgar Wilson, attorney fees 150 00 

4873 George C. Parkinson, regent's expense 154 44 

5124 Moscow Electric Supply Co., electrical supplies 5 05 

5125 Mrs. Mary E. Young, domestic science supplies 9 39 

5126 Mrs. Samuel H. Hays, regent's expense 53 50 

5127 H, C. Aosved, salary 85 75 

5128 Idaho Post, printing and stationery 169 95 

512 9 Moscow Grocery Co., domestic science supplies 4 65 

5130 Moscow Transfer Co., drayage 9 00 

5131 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 7 65 

5132 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and 

power 69 44 



Vlll 



APPENDIX 



5133 
5134 
5135 
5136 
5137 
5138 
5139 
5140 
5141 
5142 
5143 
5144 
5145 

5146 
5147 
5148 
5149 
5150 
5151 
5152 
5153 
5154 
5155 
5156 
5157 
5158 
5159 
5160 
5161 
5162 
5458 
5459 
5460 
5 461 
5462 
5463 
5464 
5465 
5466 
5467 
5468 
5469 
5470 
5471 
5695 
5696 
5697 
5698 
5699 
5700 
5701 
5702 



5704 
5705 
5 7 ('6 
5707 



City of Moscow, water rent 150 00 

R. Hodg-ins, sundry supplies 15 60 

C. M. Fassett Co., mining- supplies 4 50 

Electric Appliance Co., electric supplies 37 50 

Hagan & Cushing, domestic science supplies 3 00 

J. C. Flanagan & Son, labor 2 4 80 

Shaw & Borden Co., stationery 28 50 

Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 4 00 

John C. Olmsted, landscape architect 240 00 

O. C. Carssow, domestic science supplies 13 20 

Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 4 75 

Eagle Lock Co., locks 1 44 

Empire Tea & Crockery Co., domestic science sup- 
plies 185 65 

Grice & Son, office furniture 63 05 

Bursar Account, regent expenses 32 65 

Bursar account, sundry labor, freig-ht, etc 358 98 

James A. MacLean, salary 150 00 

O. B. Edgett, salary 75 00 

Pac Tel. & Tel. C, telephone 5 75 

George Steunenberg, salary 40 00 

Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

Rosa Forney, salary 83 35 

H. L. Axtell, salary 100 00 

J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

T. J. Cogswell, salary 91 65 

John Almquist, salary 55 00 

W. A. Zumhof, salary 75 00 

J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

W. L. Payne, salary 70 00 

Tor Van Pyk, salary 16 50 

Tor Van Pyk, salary 16 50 

Tor Van Pyk, salary 16 50 

James A. MacLean, traveling expenses 91 95 

Carrie F. Thompson, salary 20 00 

Belle Sweet, salary 66 65 

Arthur McKinlay, salary 100 00 

Marshall Field & Co., library equipment 9 30 

Bushong & Co., stationery '. 84 95 

Standard Oil Co., freight 3 20 

Universal Register Co., dean's office equipment .... 57 19 

Madison Lumber Co., lumber 11 10 

Empire Hardware Co., sundry hardware 21 09 

E. S. Sweet, regent's expense 9 9 90 

George C. Parkinson, regent's expense 78 65 

Roger A. Simonson & Co., index tabs 4 70 

The A. Leitz Co., civil engineering equipment 4 00 

Collins & Orland Hardware Co 12 20 

Tor Van Pyk, salary 16 50 

Childers & Childers, domestic science supplies 2 60 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 5 75 

Holley-Mason Hardware Co., sundry hardware .... 5 20 
Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and 

power 5 23 

Carrie F. Thompson, .salary 20 00 

J. S. DeLury, salary 126 90 

liausch & Lomb Optical Co., microscopes 189 00 

Bursar Account, sundry labor, freight, etc 319 38 



APPENDIX 



IX 



5708 James A. MacLean, salary 150 00 

5709 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

5710 O. B. Edgett, salary 75 00 

5711 John Almquist, salary 55 00 

5712 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 65 

5713 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 85 

5714 W. A. Zumhof, salary 75 00 

5715 I. J. Cogswell, salary 91 85 

5716 Arthur McKinlay, salary 100 00 

5717 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 73 40 

5718 H. C. Aosved, salary 40 45 

5719 George Steunenberg 40 00 

5720 Belle Sweet, salary 66 85 

5721 Rosa Forney, salary 83 15 

5722 R. W. Morris, N. P. Ry. Co., freight 1,484 03 

7061 Clarkston Commercial Co., bunting 2 55 

7062 James F. McCarthy, regent's expenses 34 75 

7063 Bursar Account, regent's expenses 7 25 

8217 Gertrude L. Hays, regent's expenses 49 80 

8426 Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 34 25 

S978 The Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 7 50 

9439 M. E. Lewis, regent's expenses 261 15 

9943 Mrs. S. H. Hays, regent's expenses 50 48 

10214 O. E. McCutcheon, regent's expenses 107 75 

10314 Bursar Account, regent's expenses 6 95 

10967 Mrs. S. H. Hays, regent's expenses 47 10 

10968 O. E. McCutcheon, regent's expenses 82 50 

11404 H. C. Aosved, carpenter wages 22 20 

11405 Bursar Account, regent's expenses 20 70 

11751 Bursar Account, regent's expenses 2 50 

12471 E. H. Moffitt, regent's expenses 21 70 

12472 Mrs. S. H. Hays, regent's expenses 11 93 

Grand Total 

Regent's expenses $ 1,200 00 

Maintenance 27.100 00 



$28,300 00 



STATE WARRANTS — UNIVERSITY FUND. 

315 Moscow Hardware Company, sundry hardware 5 70 

316 Moscow Hardware Company, sundry hardware 8 00 

1 George E. Fellows, dues 10 00 

2 H. L. Axtell, salary 100 00 

3 State Publishing Company, Montana session laws 2 50 

4 Tor Van Pyk, salary 49 50 

5 Bertha Ransom, salary 2 00 

6 Moscow Electric Light & Power Co., light and power 295 19 

7 Mary E. Young, domestic science supplies 11 20 

8 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

9 Western Union Telegraph Co., clock rental 15 00 

10 H. T. French, dues 5 00 

11 N. Williamson, military equipment 13 60 

12 David & Ely Co., domestic science supplies 4 05 

13 Zumhof & Collins, sundry blacksmithing 95 95 

14 CM. Fassett, mining supplies 123 15 

15 Arthur McKinlay, salary 100 00 

16 R. S. Harris, salary 50 00 

17 Moscow Commission Co., coal 154 50 



APPENDIX 



18 Motter- Wheeler Co., janitor supplies IZ 12 

19 J. E. Mudg-ett & Son, wood sawing 22 80 

20 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 87 35 

21 Northwestern School Furniture Company, chairs. . . . 137 50 

22 Brimley Bros., biology supplies 7 40 

23 C. F. Stork, heating stove 4 00 

2 4 City of Moscow, water rent 150 00 

25 Statesman Printing Co.. printing regent's report 135 90 

26 Bursar account, sundry labor, freight and express. . . . 739 08 

27 Pacific States Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 7 38 

28 John W. Cadby. magazines 40 00 

2 9 Belle Sweet, salary 66 65 

30 Berenice Maynard, salary 45 00 

31 Mutual Subscription Agency, subscriptions 274 05 

32 W. E. Pierce & Co., insurance 173 50 

33 Bursar account, sundry labor 39 00 

34 James Fogle, salary 60 00 

35 George Steunenberg, salary 40 00 

36 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

3 7 Rosa Forney, salary 83 35 

38 John Almquist, salary 55 00 

39 Skelton Publishing Co., Utah session laws 2 15 

40 A. L. Vroman, plumbing 142 10 

41 David & Ely Co., sundry supplies 20 8 5 

42 T. J. Cogswell, salary 274 95 

43 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

44 VC. A. Zumhof, salary 75 00 

45 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 20 00 

46 L. W. Thrailkill, insurance 125 00 

47 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 20 90 

48 Bobbins «& Myers Co., motor 78 00 

4 9 Madison Lumber Co., lumber and coal 42 7 5 

50 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 8 90 

51 Chris Anderson, wood working 6 50 

52 Shaw & Borden Co., stationery 7 00 

53 Madison Lumber Co., lumber, coal and lime 45 10 

54 Baker & Co., repairing platinum crucibles 31 6 5 

55 Electric Appliance Co., electrical supplies 26 17 

5 6 David & Ely Co., domestic science supplies 520 

5 7 Mrs. M. E. Young, sundry domestic science expenses. . 15 35 

58 Empire Tea & Crockery Co., jars and glasses 4 70 

59 C. M. Fassett, mining supplies 27 55 

60 Bursar account, sundry labor 52 86 

61 D. Van Nostrand Co., balance on book 56 

62 John Wiley & Sons 87 

63 O. A. Benedict, salary 18 72 

6 i O. A. Benedict, salary 82 25 

6 5 W. A. Lauder, cement 4 20 

66 Charles C. Swann, domestic science supplies 26 05 

6 7 C. A. Campbell, drayage 1 00 

68 Charles E. Sholes Co., chemistry supplies 218 23 

61) Casco Biological Supply Co.. biological supplies 6 75 

70 Maiinc liiological Laboratory, biological supplies .... 5 60 

71 (\ M. Kemp Mfg. Co., chemistry equipment 7 00 

7 2 II. C. AoHved, salary 66 65 

73 Ceorgo r^rcighton, sundry supplies 1 50 

7 4 Mo.scow Transfer Co., drayage and freight 2 00 

75 Slatesman Prinling Co., subscription 6 60 



APPENDIX 



XI 



82 Tull & Gibbs, window shades 12 20 

83 N. Williamson, piano 240 00 

84 M. F. Zeigler, supplies 10 30 

85 John W. Graham, sundry eiuipnient 18 50 

86 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 12 30 

87 Northwest School Furniture Co., furniture 330 35 

88 The Idaho Post, stationery 29 00 

89 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., moulding- 4 00 

90 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry hardware 42 58 

91 W. R. Morris, Agent N. P. Ry. Co., coal 143 00 

92 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., lumber 27 50 

93 Empire Hardware Co., sundry equipment 3 20 

04 Moscow Hardware Co., hardware 1 15 

95 The Idaho Post, stationery 45 50 

96 Pollatch Lumber Co.. lumber 495 96 

9 7 Moscow Printing & Publishing Co., advertising 7 20 

98 Standard Dray Co., drayage 25 75 

99 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 48 05 

100 H. C. Aosved, salary : 77 80 

101 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 8 10 

102 V. H. Brown, piano tuning 12 50 

103 H. Belton, painting 5 2 5 

104 J. C. Flanagan, painting 5 25 

105 Statesman Printing Co., subscription 10 5 

106 Curtis R. Burley, traveling expenses 14 2 5 

107 Berenice S. Maynard, traveling expenses 7 90 

108 E. M. Hulme, traveling expenses 22 75 

109 W. S. Morley, traveling expenses 24 65 

110 Bursar Account, sundry labor and other items 235 12 

111 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

112 H. L. Axtell, salary » 125 00 

113 James A. MacLean, salary 150 00 

114 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

115 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

116 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

117 Mrs. M. E. Young 83 33 

118 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 

119 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

120 Evan T. Sage, salary 166 66 

121 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

12 2 Rosa Forney, salary 91 65 

123 O. B. Edgett, salary 83 35 

12 4 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 50 00 

125 Alice Horning, salary 45 00 

126 Charles Witherspoon, insurance 45 00 

127 The C. & M. E. Lewis Co., insurance 45 00 

128 The C. & M. E. Lewis Co., insurance 45 00 

129 William Hunter, Agent, insurance '. 45 00 

130 W. G. Barge, insurance 45 00 

131 Thompson Brothers, insurance 45 00 

132 F. E. Cornwall, Agent, insurance 45 00 

133 D. W. Driskel, insurance 45 00 

134 Moore & Vinnigerholz, Agents, insurance 54 00 

135 The Banker's Surety Co., insurance 9 12 

137 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

138 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

139 E. J. Clarke, salary 55 55 

140 James A. MacLean, salary • 150 00 

141 O. B. Edgett, salary 83 35 



Xll 



APPENDIX 



142 Rosa Forney, salary 91 65 

143 Evan T. Sage, salary 83 33 

144 Mrs. M. E. Young-, salary 83 35 

145 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

146 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

147 A. P. Vaughn, salary 70 00 

148 Ella Woods, salary 25 00 

149 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 

150 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

151 H. L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

152 Etta MaGuire, salary 25 00 

153 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

154 Henry C. Aosved, salary 93 30 

155 Orah Howard, traveling expenses 7 95 

156 Mabel Wilkinson, traveling expenses 3 85 

157 Mrs. M. E. Young, traveling expenses 3 40 

158 James A. MacLean, traveling expenses 131 60 

159 Bursar account, sundry labor, freight and express. . . 534 18 

160 David & Ely Co., sundry supplies 48 30 

161 Grice & Son, desks and stools 70 20 

162 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 11 90 

16 3 J. C. Flanagan, varnish and filler 15 45 

164 Naylor & Cummings, insurance 134 00 

165 Morgareidge & Manspeaker, insurance 90 00 

166 Spotswood & Veatch, agents, insurance 94 00 

167 W. G. Barge, insurance 52 50 

168 Moore & Vennigerholz, agents, insurance 52 00 

169 S. A. Anderson, insurance 91 00 

170 D. M. Eckman, insurance 63 00 

171 A. H. Oversmith, agent, insurance 36 75 

172 First Trust Company, agents, insurance 125 00 

173 C. H. Patten, insurance 125 00 

174 John F. Ogden, insurance 36 75 

175 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 25 00 

176 J. M. Connor, drayage 6 75 

177 Pacific Tel & Tel. Co., telephone 9 60 

178 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 121 20 

179 Engineering News Publishing Co., advertising 2 76 

180 Charles Witherspoon, insurance 25 00 

181 F. E. Cornwall, insurance 62 50 

182 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing 391 71 

183 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 210 60 

184 Moscow Electric Supply Co., electrical equipment.... 71 58 

185 Tull & Gibbs, chairs 60 00 

186 Moscow Hardware Company, sundry hardware 8 15 

1 87 Ginn & Co., books 26 94 

188 J. J. Sterner, negatives and photos 35 10 

1 89 Grice & Son, chairs 54 00 

1 90 George W. Canner, signs 2 75 

1 91 Jones & Dillingham, window glass 5 76 

1 92 George Crelghton, toweling 2 45 

193 Collins & Orland Hardware Company, sundry hard- 

ware 62 35 

1 94 James A. MacLean, salary 150 00 

1 95 Mrs. M. Marcy, salary 80 00 

1 96 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

1 97 Ella Woods, salary 25 00 

198 Kosa Fornfy, salary 91 65 



APPENDIX 



Xlll 



199 H. L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

200 Evan T. Sage, salary 83 33 

201 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

202 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

203 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

204 O. B. Edgett, salary 83 35 

20 5 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 

206 A. P. Vaughn, salary 70 00 

207 Alice Horning, salary 90 00 

208 J. H. Horton. salary 60 00 

209 Mary E. Young, salary 83 35 

210 E. J. Clarke, salary 83 3 5 

211 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

212 Henry Aosved, salary 87 50 

213 Etta Maguire, salary 15 00 

214 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 25 00 

215 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 7 75 

216 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 161 70 

217 G. Hallam, carpentering 18 00 

218 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., equipment and 

supplies 43 90 

219 Northwest School Furniture Co., chairs 20 00 

220 John W. Graham & Co.. dean's office equipment 42 50 

221 C. F. Burr, agent, insurance 52 50 

2 22 Moscow Transfer Company, drayage 2 50 

223 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 30 00 

224 Alice Horning, salary 45 00 

225 Ella Woods, salary 25 00 

2 26 Francis Jenkins, salary .*. . . 95 8 5 

227 Rosa Forney, salary 91 65 

228 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

229 Mary E. Young, salary 83 35 

230 Charles E. Dvorak, salary 100 00 

231 James A. MacLean, salary 166 66 

232 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

233 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

234 E. J. Clarke, salary 83 35 

235 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

2 36 Etta Maguire, salary 15 00 

237 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 

238 H. L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

239 A. P. Vaughn, salary 70 00 

240 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 40 00 

241 Evan T. Sage, salary 83 33 

242 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

243 The University Argonaut, advertising 15 00 

244 Empire Hardware Company, lock 2 60 

2 45 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., door stops 1 80 

246' Standard Lumber Co., lumber 80 20 

2 47 Grice & Son, desks 114 55 

248 Tucker-Hanford Company, warrant blanks 36 25 

249 W. S. Morley, traveling expenses 14 00 

250 C. F. Burr, insurance 36 00 

251 R. Pickering, agent, insurance 183 00 

252 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

2 53 James A. MacLean, salary 166 66 

254 Alice Horning, salary 45 00 

255 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 



XIV 



APPENDIX 



256 Etta Maguire, salary 15 00 

257 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

258 Rosa Forney, salary 91 65 

259 Mrs. Mary E. Young, salary 83 35 

260 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 40 00 

2 61 Ella Woods, salary 25 00 

262 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

263 A. P. Vaughn, salary 70 00 

264 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

265 E. J. Clarke, salary 83 35 

266 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

267 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

268 May Caldwell, salary 30 00 

269 Evan T. Sage, salary 83 33 

270 H. L. Axtell, salary '. . 125 00 

271 Charles E. Dvorak, salary 100 00 

273 James A. MacLean, salary 166 65 

274 E. J. Clarke, salary 83 35 

275 A. P. Vaughn, salary 70 00 

276 Evan T. Sage, salary 83 33 

277 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 

278 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

2 79 H. L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

280 Etta Maguire, salary 15 00 

281 Rosa Forney, salary 91 6 5 

282 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 25 00 

283 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

284 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

2 85 A. W. Smith, salary 50 00 

286 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

287 Mary E. Young, salary 83 35 

288 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

289 May Caldwell, salary ' 30 00 

290 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

291 Ella Woods, salary ". . . . 25 00 

292 Charles E. Dvorak, salary 100 00 

293 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 7 50 

294 City of Moscow, installation of water meters 303 48 

295 Estel Hunter, printing 6 15 

296 Empire Hardware Co., sundry hardware 14 65 

297 Remington Typewriter Co., ribbons and repairs 3 50 

298 A. P. Vaughn, publicity bureau 2 19 

299 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

300 Alice Horning, salary 45 00 

301 Alice Horning, salary 45 00 

302 I. G. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

303 James A. MacLean, salary 166 65 

304 Mary E. Young, salary 83 35 

305 Rosa Forney, salary 91 65 

306 Carrie F, Thompson, salary 25 00 

307 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

308 A. W. Smith, salary 40 00 

309 Charles E. Dvorak, salary 100 00 

310 A. P. Vaughn, salary 70 00 

311 II, L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

312 Belle Swoet, salary 75 00 

313 J. H. Horton, salary 20 00 

314 May Caldwell, salary 30 00 



A.PPENDTX XV 



315 E. J. Clarke, salary 

316 Evan T. Sage, salary 

317 W. A. Zumhof, salary 

31S Etta Maguire, salary 

319 Ella Woods, salary 

320 W. A. Simpson, salary 

321 Francis Jenkins, salary 

322 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 

323 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 

32 4 Standard Dray Co., drayage 

32 5 City of Moscow, water rent 

326 Ross R. Sherfey, typewriter supplies . . 

32 7 J. J. Sterner, prints 

32 8 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry hardware 

329 Grice & Son, furnishings, Liszt Hall... 

330 L. E. Gurney, traveling expenses 

332 J. G. Eldridge, salary ". 

333 Francis Jenkins, salary 

334 E. M. Hulme, salary 

33 5 James A. MacLean, salary 

3 36 I. J. Cogswell, salary 

337 Rosa Forney, salary 

338 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 

33 9 Etta Maguire, salary 

3 40 Belle Sweet, salary 

3 41 Charles E. Dvorak, salary 

3 42 W. A. Simpson, salary 

3 43 May Caldwell, salary 

344 A. P. Vaughn, salary 

345 W. A. Zumhof, salary 

3 46 Evan T. Sage, salary 

347 J. R. Middleton, traveling expenses . . . 

348 E. J. Clarke, salary 

349 A. W. Smith, salary 

3 50 H. L. Axtell, salary 

351 H. N. Black, architect 

352 E. C. Lloyd, carriage hire 

35 3 W. S. Morley, traveling expenses 

354 H. L. Axtell, traveling expenses 

355 Philip Soulen, traveling expenses 

356 James A. MacLean, traveling expenses . . 

357 J. G. Eldridge, traveling expenses 

358 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 

359 A. G. Long, twelve fire extinguishers. . . . 

360 General Electric Co., electrical supplies. . 

361 Ella Woods, salary 

362 Francis Jenkins, salary 

363 A. P. Vaughn, salary 

364 I. J. Cogswell, salary 

365 May Caldwell, salary 

366 James A. MacLean, salary 

367 W. A. Simpson, salary 

368 Pcosa Forney, salary 

369 A. W. Smith, salary 

370 W. A. Zumhof, salary 

371 Belle Sweet, salary 

372 Evan T. Sage, salary 

373 Mrs. Mary E. Young, salary 



83 


35 


83 


33 


83 


35 


15 


00 


25 


00 


40 


00 


95 


85 


8 


25 


7 


50 


4 


25 


99 


89 


4 


75 


4 


00 


4 


50 


7 


10 


19 


60 


166 


65 


95 


85 


150 


00 


166 


65 


100 


00 


91 


65 


25 


00 


15 


00 


75 


00 


100 


00 


60 


00 


30 


00 


70 


00 


83 


35 


83 


33 


9 


70 


83 


35 


40 


00 


125 


00 


313 


75 


3 


00 


89 


70 


28 


80 


49 


20 


106 


20 


32 


45 


16 


65 


156 


00 


28 


17 


33 


33 


95 


85 


70 


00 


100 


00 


30 


00 


166 


65 


60 


00 


91 


65 


40 


00 


83 


35 


75 


00 


83 


33 


83 


35 



XYl 



APPENDIX 



374 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

375 E. J. Clarke, salary 83 35 

3 76 Etta McGuire, salary 15 00 

377 Mrs. Mary E. Young, salary 83 35 

378 Carrie F. Thompson, salary 25 00 

379 H. L. Axtell. salary 125 00 

380 A. W. Smith, salary 40 00 

381 H. C. Aosved. salary 83 35 

382 A. P. Vaughn, salary ' . . . . 70 00 

383 A. P. Vaughn, salary 70 00 

384 Belle Sweet, salary 83 35 

385 John Almquist, salary 60 00 

386 A. W. Smith, salary 75 00 

387 James A. MacLean. salary 166 65 

388 Etta McGuii-e, salary 30 00 

389 H. L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

390 H. L. Axtell, salary 137 50 

391 Evan T. Sage, salary 91 65 

392 Evan T. Sage, salary 83 37 

393 Bruce D. Mudgett. salary 20 00 

394 E. J. Clarke, salary 83 35 

395 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

396 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 65 

397 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

398 W. A. Simpson, salary 60 00 

399 Edward M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

400 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

401 Potlatch Lumber Co.. fuel 273 20 

402 Gertrude Stephenson, stenographer 10 95 

403 Louis P. Shanks, salary 125 00 

404 May Caldwell, salary 30 00 

405 J. R. Middleton, salary 66 65 

406 Nellie A. Regan, salary 66 65 

407 Permeal French, salary 100 00 

408 A. P. Vaughn, salary 100 00 

409 Sadie Stockton, salary 20 00 

410 Etta McGuire, salary 21 00 

411 Moscow Transfer Co., hauling coal 128 86 

412 H. A. Sheyer. carpenter, met. lab. equipment 1 50 

413 E. J. Chesley, labor 12 50 

414 O. A. Benedict, carpenter 3 00 

415 E. Savage, labor 5 00 

416 David & Ely Co.. Ltd.. supplies 4 60 

417 N. Williamson, domestic art supplies 2 25 

418 Grice & Son, tablet arm chairs 377 50 

419 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., chalk rail 7 00 

420 L. P. Wallner, cord wood 193 38 

421 Permeal French, traveling expenses 19 70 

422 May Caldwell, salary 30 00 

423 H. C. Aosved, salary . 83 35 

424 Belle Sweet, salary 83 35 

4 2 5 Evan T. Sage, .salary 91 65 

4 2r, J. R. Middleton, .salary 66 65 

Grand total $31,192 11 



APPENDIX 



XVll 



STATE WARRANTS — SCHOOIi OF SCIENCE FUND. 

3 E. M. Hulnie, public lecture committee expense $ 75 00 

4 M. E. Young-, traveling- expenses 9 00 

5 H. L. Axtell, salary 100 00 

6 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

7 O. B. Edgett, salary 83 35 

8 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 35 

9 J. H. Horton, salary 60 00 

10 H. L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

11 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 

12 James A. MacLean, salary 150 00 

13 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 85 

14 George Steunenberg-, salary 40 00 

15 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 65 

16 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

17 O. K. Fastener, dean's office supplies 1 90 

18 The Plant World, subscription 2 25 

19 William Gaertner & Co., physics equipment 12 15 

20 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundry hardware.... 17 60 

21 W. & L. E. Gurley, civil eng-ineering equipment 8 75 

22 Tull & Bibbs, two shades 1 80 

23 Electric Appliance Co., electrical supplies 22 79 

24 Bursar account, sundry labor, freig-ht and express. . . . 197 41 
2 5 Cambridge Botanical Supply Co., botany equipment. . 7 13 

26 Standard Oil Co., gasoline 27 25 

27 Williams, Brown & Earle, physics equipment 4 35 

28 Moscow Hardware Co., Ltd., domestic science sup- 

plies 20 40 

29 The Mine and Smelter Supply Co., mining equipment. . 5 85 

30 Eiler Piano House, piano 160 00 

31 F. W. Braun Co., mining supplies 27 88 

32 A. T. Thompson & Co., physics equipment 236 90 

33 Moscow Electric Supply Co., fiat irons 12 00 

34 H. B. Humphrey, botanical specimens 5 00 

35 Charles E. Sholes Co., chemical supplies 32 10 

36 N. Williamson, civil engineering supplies 75 

37 E. H. Sarg-ent & Co., chemical equipment 10 29 

38 The Leeds & Northrup Co., repairing- dynamo 22 15 

39 Salt Lake Hardware Co., Keller balance 120 00 

40 Willard K. Gwin, botanical specimens 2 5 00 

41 Eugene Deitzgen Co., civil engineering equipment 17 55 

42 C. H. Stoelting Co., physics equipment 49 25 

43 The Engineering Magazine, book 2 00 

44 Central Scientific Co., physics equipment . 77 66 

45 The Mine and Smelter Supply Co., mining- supplies. . . 38 27 

46 G. W. Braun Co., chemistry supplies 182 76 

47 Prael, Hegele & Co., inc., domestic science supplies. . . 51 47 

48 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 3 90 

49 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing , 1 45 

50 Charles A. Strelinger Co., physics equipment 70 70 

51 Charles A. Strelinger Co., shop equipment 14 11 

52 Electric Appliance Co., physics equipment 17 35 

53 C. M. Fassett, magnifier 4 25 

54 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

55 Rosa Forney, salary 91 65 

56 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 1119 

57 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., lig-ht and power 14 48 

58 Bursar account, freight 129 85 



xvni 



APPENDIX 



5 9 B. E. Janes, traveling expenses 4 90 

60 Bursar account, freight 51 90 

61 William Ainsworth & Sons, mining equipment 46 2 

62 The Scientific Shop, physics equipment 45 18 

63 The Mine and Smelter Supply Co., mining equipment 2 2 5 

64 Charles E. Sholes Co., mining supplies 38 41 

65 The Leeds & Northrup Co., physics equipment 563 05 

6 6 The Mine & Smelter Supply Co., chemistry supplies . . 24 52 

67 E. H. Sargent & Co., chemistry supplies 100 87 

68 CM. Fassett Co., mining equipment 6 00 

69 C. M. Fassett, mining supplies 7 37 

" 70 The Owl Drug Store, chemical supplies 225 

71 Mine & Smelter Supply Co., chemistry equipment 76 77 

72 F. W. Braun, geological supplies 1 60 

74 Standard Dray Co., drayage 8 00 

75 Mine & Smelter Supply Co., mining supplies 435 

76 Swann & Coffin, janitor supplies 17 50 

77 George Creighton, toweling 8 21 

78 Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., biological equipment 74 05 

79 Foote Mineral Co., chemistry supplies 6 50 

80 Tinius Olsen & Co., remainder on testing machine . . . 470 75 

81 H. C. Aosved, salary 86 70 

82 Spencer Lens Co., biological supplies 194 

83 St. Louis Biological Laboratory, microscope slides. ... 14 25 

84 Madison Lumber Co., fire brick 3 50 

85 E. H. Sargent & Co., chemistry equipment 105 05 

86 Doeer Mitchell Electric Co., electrical supplies 3 00 

87 Mine & Smelter Supply Co., chemical supplies 7 18 

88 The Denver Fire Clay Co., geological supplies 3 85 

89 David & Ely Co., office and janitor supplies 5 90 

90 Mine & Smelter Supply Co., vacuum tubing 3 40 

91 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundry hardware 32 15 

92 St. Louis Biological Laboratory, miscroscope slides. ... 22 00 

93 General Electric Co., flat irons 12 75 

94 Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., slide boxes 4 50 

95 Jones & Dillingham, window glass 170 

96 Bursar account, sundry labor, freight and postage... 684 60 

97 Philip Soulen, traveling expenses 31 60 

98 J. S. DeLury, traveling expenses 5 30 

99 A. P. Vaughn, traveling expenses 22 60 

100 Western Union Telegraph Co., clock rental 15 00 

101 D. W, Driskill, insurance 52 50 

102 Boise Title & Trust Co., insurance 52 00 

103 C. F. Burr, insurance 39 00 

104 R. Pickering, insurance 39 00 

105 The Commercial Trust Co., insurance 52 50 

106 A. V. Scott, insurance 52 50 

107 George C. Parkinson, insurance 130 00 

108 R. C. West, insurance 52 50 

109 The C. & M. E. Lewis Co., insurance 125 00 

110 Allis Chalmers Co., freight on testing machine 67 20 

111 E. H. Sargent & Co., chemistry equipment and supplies 86 89 

112 Valvoline Oil Co., cylinder oil 4 50 

113 The Charles A. Strelinger Co., physics equipment.... 14 33 

114 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry hardware 5 15 

115 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry hardware 3 35 

116 H. L. Axtell, traveling expenses 19 60 

1 1 7 Bursar account, freight 195 88 



APPENDIX 



XIX 



118 Idaho-Washington Lig-ht & Power Co., construction 

equipment 17 23 

119 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 111 15 

120 G. Hallam, wages 12 25 

121 E. McConnell, wages 12 00 

12 2 W. Johns, wages 7 36 

123 B. McConnell, wages 41 3'9 

12 4 H. Staples, wages 18 25 

125 Union Iron Works, shop supplies 59 60 

126 Eimer & Amend, chemistry supplies 437 49 

127 . Mrs. M. E. Young, domestic science supplies 3 40 

12 8 The Idaho Post, printing 17 0.0 

129 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundry hardware. ... 17 15 

130 Samuel Lewis, auger 4 75 

131 Electric Appliance Co., electrical equipment 9138 

132 Ermine Deitzgen Co., steel tape 4 05 

133 Eimer & Amend, sundry equipment 88 39 

134 G. Hallam, wages 2 00 

135 E. McConnell, wages 7 50 

136 Joe Weeks, wages 3 50 

137 Fred Brauer, wages 3 50 

138 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 16 90 

139 C. Clendenning, wages 2 50 

140 W. D. Smith, printing 8 00 

141 Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., watt meter 45 93 

142 Grice & Son, desk 22 50 

143 Swann & Coffin, domestic science supplies 115 95 

144 Valvoline Oil Co., oil 8 75 

145 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., belting 16 90 

146 Empire Hardware Co., sundry hardware 5 15 

147 General Electric Co., transformer Ill 00 

148 N. Williamson, belt and matting ^ 6 78 

149 David & Ely Co., Ltd., domestic science supplies 3 54 

150 Doeer Mitchell Electric Co., electrical supplies 6 00 

151 Bursar account, sundry labor, freight, fuel and postage 264 22 

152 W. L. Zeigler, salary 12 50 

153 Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., biological supplies 10 21 

154 Union Iron Works, belt and pulleys 29 60 

155 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., belt 10 37 

156 Standard Oil Co., freight 1 99 

157 Oregon & Washington Sewer Pipe Co., sewer pipe. ... 66 67 

158 Doeer-Mitchel Electric Co., wire 25 73 

159 E. H. Sargent & Co., chemistry equipment 12 40 

16 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundry hardware.... 4 20 

161 Moscow Hardware Co., sundry hardware 37 95 

162 Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., biological equipment. ... 3 10 

163 The Hendrie & Bolthoff Mfg. & Supply Co., wire 6 60 

164 W. A. Lauder, cement 43 55 

165 Empire Hardware Co., sundry hardware 5 50 

166 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundry hardware.... 81 80 

167 General Electric Co., electrical equipment 69 44 

168 Eagle Lock Co., locks and keys 1 06 

169 The Prang Educational Co., domestic science supplies. 19 32 

170 I. J. Cogswell, music stands 4 25 

171 N. Williamson, rubber gloves 25 

172 Chris Anderson, oak lumber 2 25 

173 W. L. Zeigler, band music 8 00 

174 General Electric Co., clamp 3 30 



XX 



APPENDIX 



175 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing supplies 

176 V. H. Brown, piano tuning 

177 B. McConnell, wages 

178 E. T. McConnell, w^ages 

179 Joe Weeks, wages 

180 M. L. Romig, wages 

iSl Bursar account, freight and express 

182 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., electrical equip- 

ment 

183 American Instrument Co., repairing a meter 

184 Standard Dray Co., drayage 

185 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 

186 David & Ely Co., military efluipment 

187 Remington Typewriter Co., typewriter supplies 

188 The Scientific Shop, physics equipment 

189 P. W. Braun, geology supplies 

190 Sw^ann & Coffin, sundry supplies 

191 Eimer & Amend, chemistry equipment 

192 Zumhof & Collins, sundry blacksmithing 

193 P. P. Caproni & Bro., domestic art supplies 

194 The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co., military equipment 

195 General Electric Co., electrical supplies 

196 Bursar account, freight and postage 

197 General Electric Co., electrical supplies 

198 R. Hodgins, sundry stationery supplies 

199 Swann & Coffin, dom. science supplies 

200 David & Ely Co., Ltd 

201 B. F. Thompson, dom. art equipment 

202 J. L. Bourn, dom. science supplies 

203 American Entomological Co.; equip, for biology dept. . 

204 The Globe-Wernicke Co., filing case 

205 Hotlzer-Cabot Electric Co., watchman's dial sheets. . . 

206 The University Argonaut, publishing notice 

207 David & Ely Company, Ltd., supplies 

208 Bradley Engineering and Machinery Co., mining ma- 

chinery 

209 The Owl Drug Store, stationery 

210 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing repairs 

211 Hagan & Cushing, dom. science supplies 

212 John J. Schick, music programs 

213 Moscow Hardware Company, general supplies 

214 Zumhof & Collins, general blacksmithing 

215 Carl Fischer, band music 

216 American Engraving Co., half tone engraving 

217 General Electric Co., lamps 

218 Chandler & Barber, domestic art equipment 

219 Standard Oil Company, chemistry supplies 

220 Moscow Hardware Company, general supplies 

221 The Idaho Post, printing and stationery 

222 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., general hardware. . . . 

223 J. C. Flanagan, painter's wages and supplies 

22 4 Moscow Steam Laundry, domestic science laundry. . . . 

2 25 M. L. Romig, wages general cleaning 

226 G. Beck, wages metallurgical laboratory bldg 

227 J. Ilallam, carpenter metallurgical laboratory bldg. . . . 

228 J. J. St<Tner, orchestra music for Commencement. . . . 

229 Edwin S. Hinks, traveling expenses to attend Com- 

mencement 25 85 



30 


18 


12 


50 


57 


78 


9 


?5 


4 


50 


7 


78 


29 


51 


531 


15 


3 


00 


4 


25 


84 


90 


98 


00 


1 


60 


11 


50 


2 


16 


8 


00 


20 


47 


9 


75 


14 


45 


5 


00 


65 


63 


79 


73 


28 


48 


26 


60 


50 


85 


7 


25 


3 


50 


4 


70 


93 


75 


29 


78 


4 


17 


3 


75 


3 


10 


14 


52 


3 


50 


14 


66 


34 


90 


2 


00 


57 


70 


36 


15 


13 


95 


131 


20 


13 


69 


16 


20 


66 


20 


22 


06 


30 


80 


65 


80 


38 


05 


17 


10 


20 


56 


15 


75 


58 


50 


If) 


00 



APPENDIX 



XXI 



230 Marion Zumhof, janitor, general cleaning 17 50 

231 Frank Rayburn, Jr., janitor, general cleaning 19 00 

232 W. Frank Rayburn, janitor, general cleaning 16 75 

233 W. F. Rayburn, janitor, general cleaning 22 75 

23 4 M. L. Romig, janitor, general cleaning 22 22 

235 G. Hallam, wages, carpenter, metallurgical laboratory. 88 00 

236 Standard Dray Company, drayage 17 75 

237 Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co., telephone rental. . 8 50 

238 W. B. McConnell, wages metallurgical laboratory 7 50 

239 Moscow Transfer Company, drayage "lO 00 

2 40 Frank Rayburn, wages metallurgical laboratory 18 75 

241 Quinn Wilson, page ad. in the annual 16 00 

242 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 73 50 

243 C. W. Colver, teaching mathematics •. 15 00 

244 Bruce D. Mudgett, teaching mathematics 15 00 

245 W. B. McConnell, wages metallurgical laboratory .... 5 00 

246 W. L. Zeigler, band master 12 50 

247 A. P. Vaughn, traveling expenses and supplies 4 65 

248 General Electric Co., oil tank 1 70 

249 A. J. Sonna, catalogue expense 3 20 

250 Francis Jenkins, freight and postage 200 61 

251 Francis Jenkins, sundry labor 216 52 

252 Butterfield-Elder Implement Co., Ltd., power belts. ... 961 

253 N. Williamson, house lining 2 40 

254 W. S. Bobbins, ice 95 

255 Press Publishing Co., bulletins 174 00 

256 Empire Hardware Company, sundry hdw. supplies. . . 20 18 

257 The Star-Mirror, printing and stationery 94 70 

258 Madison Lumber & Mill Co., lumber 16 50 

259 Oliver Machinery Co., civil engineering equipment. . . 20 36 

260 John W. Graham & Co., civil engineering supplies .... 160 

261 Moscow Hardware Co., Muresco 9 25 

262 Edward M. Hulme, traveling expenses 9 25 

263 Francis Jenkins, freight and sundry labor 479 02 

264 G. Beck, mining building labor 18 35 

265 Moscow Transfer Co., moving pianos 6 00 

266 The Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and 

power 37 75 

267 Standard Dray Co., hauling 7 50 

268 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 12 25 

26 9 J. C. Flanagan, painter 15 75 

270 L. A. Hunting, labor metallurgical laboratory 4 02 

271 H. L. Staples, carpenter metallurgical laboratory 33 00 

272 H. C. Aosved, carpenter 47 80 

273 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 

274 Francis Jenkins, salary 95 65 

275 W. A. Simpson, salary 60 00 

276 E. M. Hulme, salary 150 00 

277 H. L. Axtell, salary 125 00 

278 Rosa Forney, salary 91 85 

279 A. W. Smith, salary 40 00 

2 80 Mrs. Mary E. Young, salary 83 15 

281 Belle Sweet, salary 75 00 

282 W. A. Zumhof, salary 83 15 

283 J. G. Eldridge, salary 166 85 

284 John Almquist, salary 60 00 

285 E. J. Clarke, salary 83 35 

286 Bruce D. Mudgett, salary 50 00 



XXll 



APPENDIX 



287 James A. MacLean, salary 166 65 

288 Potlatch Lumber Co., fuel 1,021 06 

289 Oregon R. & N. Co., fuel 1,187 34 

290 H. C. Aosved, carpenter wages 91 00 

291 The Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and 

power 14 50 

292 H. L. Staples, carpenter, metallurgical laboratory 45 00 

293 Moscow Transfer Company, hauling coal 97 64 

2 94 G. Beck, wages met. lab 31 89 

295 'J. C. Flanagan, painting metallurgical laboratory. ... 24 50 

296 Ed McConnell, wages, plasterer 46 50 

297 Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, fuel 33 9 75 

298 Shaw-Borden & Co., letter heads 10 50 

299 The Idaho Post, blanks and stationery 17 00 

300 Caxton Printers, printing catalogues 616 00 

301 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., moulding 2 00 

302 Swann & Coffin, janitor supplies 125 

303 O. C. Carssow, domestic science supplies 2 75 

304 Moscow Hardware Co., Ltd., nails 4 50 

305 Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, fuel 3 75 75 

306 Francis Jenkins, freight and sundry labor 76 25 

307 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 31 61 

308 Francis Jenkins, freight 30 47 

309 Edward M. Hulme, traveling expenses 17 70 

310 Engineering News, civil engineering advertisement... 1 59 

311 L. P. Wallmer, fuel 345 00 

312 Allen, S. Stewart, wages metallurgical laboratory. ... 1025 

313 Moscow Hardware Co., supplies 25 95 

314 Grice & Co., furniture and fixtures 83 50 

315 Northwest School Furniture Co., blackboards 52 00 

316 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., supplies 70 35 

317 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 13 44 

318 V. H. Brown, tuning pianos 22 50 

319 George Craighton, toweling for chemistry 325 

320 W. A. Simpson, night watchman 60 00 

321 Permeal French, salary 100 00 

322 John Almquist, salary, gardener 60 00 

323 A. P. Vaughn, salary 100 00 

324 Eber D. Kanaga, salary 125 00 

325 Nellie A. Regan 66 65 

Grand total $19,513 23 

STATE WARRANTS — AGRICVLTURAL COLLEGE FUND. 

3 J. H. Frandson, salary $ 50 00 

4 J. R. Shinn, salary 41 85 

5 Bursar account, sundry labor 61 05 

6 C. L. Smith, salary 60 00 

7 J. R. Shinn, salary 41 85 

8 J. H. Frandson, salary 50 00 

9 L. P. Schuh, moving barn 60 00 

10 J. R. Shinn, salary 41 85 

11 R. W. Morris, agent N. P. Ry., coal 259 35 

1 2 Moscow Commission Co., feed 3 95 

i:^ Butterfiold Implement Co.. Ltd., mower 53 00 

1 4 John Almruilst, salary 60 00 

1 5 J. H. Frandson, salary 50 00 

1 6 Bur.sar account, sundry labor 144 56 



APPENDIX 



XXlll 



17 J. H. Frandson, salary 

18 J. R. Shinn, salary 

19 John Almquist, salary 

20 A. L. Vroman and Son, piping 

21 The Idaho Post, sundry printing 

22 Washington Brick & Lime & M. Co.. sewer pipe 

23 F. R. Pierson Co., seeds 

2 4 John Almquist, salary 

25 J. R. Shinn, salary 

2 6 J. H. Frandson, salary 

27 J. H. Frandson, salary 

28 J. R. Shinn, salary 

29 John Almquist, salary 

30 J. H. Frandson. salary 

31 J. R. Shinn, salary , . . 

3 2 John Almquist, salary 

33 B. McConnell, wages 

34 Chris Anderson, repairs 

3 5 City of Moscow, water rent 

36 W. Johns, wages 

37 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 

38 Bursar account, sundry labor and freight 

3 9 J. G. Eldridge, traveling expenses 

40 Idaho Post, office stationery 

41 Northwestern School Furniture Co.. chairs 

42 Zumhof & Collins, blacksmithing and repairs 

43 Moscow Electric Supply Co.. electrical supplies 

4 4 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 

45 H. T. French, traveling expenses 

46 Bursar account, sundry labor and fuel 

47 Joseph L. Hill, secretary-treasurer, membership fees . . 

48 J. R. Shinn, salary 

49 J. H. Frandson, salary 

5 John Almquist, salary 

51 Moscow Steam Laundry, laundry 

52 H. C. Aosved, salary 

5 3 Standard Dray Co., drayage 

54 J. C. Flanagan, painting 

5 5 J. R. Shinn, traveling expenses 

56 J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 

57 Berenice Maynard, traveling expenses 

58 A. E. Gipson, traveling expenses 

5 9 Elias Nelson, traveling expenses 

60 Elias Nelson, institute expenses 

61 Northwest School Furniture Co., furnishings 

62 Potlatch Lumber Co.. lumber 

63 John J. Schick, printing and stationery 

6 4 The Idaho Post, printing and stationery 

6 5 R. Hodgins, sundry supplies 

66 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., moulding 

67 W. A. Lauder, cement 

68 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing and supplies 

69 Moscow Hardware Co., Ltd., sundry hardware 

70 J. J. Sterner, negatives and prints 

71 Portland Seed Co 

7 2 Moscow Commission Co., feed 

73 J. R. Shinn, salary 

74 John Almquist, salary . 



50 


00 


41 


8 5 


60 


00 


55 


38 


21 


75 


11 


70 


3 


65 


60 


00 


41 


80 


50 


00 


50 


00 


41 


80 


60 


00 


50 


00 


41 


80 


60 


00 


15 


00 


2 


50 


150 


00 


7 


08 


7 


50 


168 


81 


18 


60 


36 


2 5 


155 


6 5 


9 


00 


20 


61 


161 


30 


61 


90 


283 


48 


15 


00 


41 


80 


5 


00 


60 


00 


9 


55 


94 


50 


5 


95 


32 


10 


55 


15 


55 


55 


59 


10 


34 


80 


22 


65 


21 


05 


26 


00 


15 


05 


4 


00 


44 


50 


80 


35 


5 


41 


11 


50 


118 


58 


42 


24 


8 


00 


6 


40 


4 


20 


41 


80 


60 


00 



Xxiv APPENDIX 

75 H. C. Aosved, salary 87 50 

76 John J. Schick, bulletin 36 00 

77 The Maher & Grosh Cutlery Co., cutlery 4 20 

78 M. B. Galloway, photos 7 00 

79 Hubert Tyrrell, sand 2 40 

80 L. F. Henderson, traveling expenses 3 9 20 

81 H. T. French, traveling expenses 69 30 

82 Ellas Nelson, traveling expenses 9 65 

83 J. R. Shinn, salary 41 80 

84 John Almquist, salary 60 00 

85 J. H. Frandson, salary 5 00 

86 J. H. Frandson, salary 50 00 

87 M. L. Romig, salary 15 28 

8 8 G. H. Maughan. advertising 15 00 

89 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co.. light and power 98 65 

90 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., light and power 130 25 

91 H. C. Aosved, salary 91 00 

92 H. O. Field, salary 98 00 

93 Standard Dray Co., drayage 15 75 

94 Gem Printing Co., printing and stationery 7 50 

95 The Owl Drug Store, janitor supplies 40 00 

96 Angler Mills, shop supplies 10 73 

97 Jones & Dillingham, window glass 1 70 

98 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., lumber 10 80 

99 Idaho National Harvester Co., Ltd., grates 65 73 

100 Frank Frandson. carrots 1 50 

101 Frank Frandson, carrots 1 05 

10:^ Grice & Son, desks 49 30 

1 03 J. R. Shinn. traveling expenses 9 45 

104 H. T. French, traveling expenses 70 65 

105 J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses .* 9 30 

106 J. H. Frandson, traveling expenses 72 40 

107 Bursar account, sundry labor and stamps 173 20 

108 Etta C. Hansen, typewriter rent 4 00 

109 Bursar account, sundry labor 195 20 

110 J. L. Hills, treas., A. A. A. C. & E. S., dues 25 00 

111 Mrs. M. E. Young, traveling expenses 66 50 

112 Eagle Lock Co., locks 55 71 

113 J. J. Sterner, photographic work 2 93 

114 The Star-Mirror, printing 20 10 

115 Moscow Commission Co., feed 5 10 

116 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 335 30 

117 Hazlewood Co., Ltd., coal 178 21 

118 H. P. Eggan, photographic work 3 90 

119 J. R. Shinn, salary 41 80 

120 John Almquist, salary ' 6 00 

121 J. H. Frandson, salary 50 00 

122 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 7 95 

1 23 Moscow Transfer Co., drayage 3 00 

124 H. C. Aosved, salary 84 00 

125 H. O. Field, salary 26 25 

126 J. C. Flanagan, painting 14 55 

127 Edward M. Hulme, traveling expenses 96 70 

128 J. G. Eldridgc, salary 166 65 

1 29 W. A. Simpson, salary 60 00 

130 Alice Horning, salary 45 00 

131 Alice Horning, salary 45 00 

132 I. J. Cogswell, salary 100 00 



APPENDIX 



XXV 



133 

134 

135 

136 

137 

138 

139 

140 

141 

142 

143 

144 

145 

146 

147 

148 

149 

150 

151 

152 

153 

154 

155 

156 

157 

158 

159 

160 

161 

162 

163 

164 

165 

166 

167 

168 

169 

170 

171 

172 



2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 



9 
10 
11 



H. T. 
H. O. 
H. C. 
John 
J. H. 



Bruce D. Miidgett, salary 

Bruce D. Mudgett, salary 

W. A, Zumhof, salary 

E. J. Clarke, salary 

John Almquist, salary 

J. G. Eldridge, salary 

E. M. Hulme, salary 

Rosa Forney, salary 

Belle Sweet, salary 

Francis Jenkins, salary 

James A. McLean, salary 

J. H. Frandson, salary . 

French, salary 

Field, carpenter wages 

Aosved, carpenter wages 

Almquist, salary 

Frandson, salary 

J. R. Shinn, salary 

J. H. Frandson, salary 

Consumers' Fuel & Ice Co., fuel 

Rhodes Iron Works, fire grates 

Shaw & Borden Company, stationery supplies ... 

The Idaho Post, stationery supplies 

George Creighton, domestic art supplies 

Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 

Mrs. Mary E. Young, salary 

Evan T. Sage, salary 

J. R. Shinn, salary 

J. S. Jones, Farmers' Institute, traveling expenses. 

J. R. Shinn, salary 

W. McConnell, wages 

City of Moscow, water rent 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rental 

Pacific States Tel & Tel. Co., telephone rental . . . . 

Gillen-Chambers Co., dairy supplies 

H. C. Aosved, carpenter's wages 

Madison Lumber & Mill Co., shop lumber 

Francis Jenkins, janitor, labor . 

H. L. Axtell, salary 

A. W. Smith, salary 



33 

50 
83 
83 
60 

166 

150 
91 
75 
95 

166 
16 
22 
15 
82 
60 
50 
40 
50 
52 
49 
24 
22 
5 

222 
83 
83 
50 
12 
50 
10 
25 
7 
7 
90 
91 
67 
47 

137 
75 



174 
A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 3 1,632 

187 
il5 



35 
00 
35 

35 

00 

65 

00 

65 

00 

85 

6 5 

45 

30 

75 

25 

00 

00 

20 

00 

50 

12 

00 

75 

25 

65 

35 

33 

00 

65 

00 

33 

56 

50 

50 

86 

00 

95 

05 

50 

00 



Grand total $ 9,545 89 

UNR^ERSITY OF IDAHO REBUILDING FUND, 1907. 

Appropriation $50,000 . 00 

C. A. Hastings, for the payment of lithographing 

bonds ; $ 2 8 

A. S. "Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 1 2,261 

J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., architect fees 65 

A. S. Whitew^ay & Co., architect's estimate No. 2 



25 
23 
90 
59 
40 
10 
7 5 



A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 4 

A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 5 3,2 

J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., plans and specifications on 

heating plant 154 87 

Statesman Printing Co., notice of bids for above 7 00 

Lewiston Tribune, notice of bids for above 9 00 

Spokesman-Review, notice of bids for above 13 60 



Xxvi APPENDIX 

12 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 6 3,018 58 

13 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 7 7,566 96 

14 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 8 2,146 09 

15 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 9 1,121 14 

16 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 10. . . . 6,050 44 

17 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 11 2,995 20 

18 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 12.-. . . 2,563 14 

19 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 13. . . . 5,677 78 

20 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., architect fees 300 00 

21 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 14. . . . 5,122 38 

22 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 15 3,986 77 

23 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., architect's fees 250 00 

24 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., architect's fees 131 64 

25 J. E. Tourtellotte & Company, architect's fees 136 63 

26 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co.. architect's fees 115 64 

27 E. J. Clarke, supervisor's salary 83 35 

28 J. Hansen, labor on drain 6 00 

29 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., architect's supervision fee. . . . 101 02 

30 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., material for face of 

clock 7 06 



Total $49,829 51 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1908, (ac- 
counts contracted to cover) 170 49 



$50,000 00 



U. OF I. REBUILDTNG FUND, 1907. 

(For Rebuilding.) 

Appropriation $100,000 00 

1 L. G. Brian, Treas. State Nebraska, printing, litho- 

graphing, and express $ 2 5 80 

2 Statesman Printing Co., Pub. notice 16 50 

149 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 16. . . . 5,424 39 

150 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 18. . . . 2,766 00 

151 A. S. Whiteway & Co., architect's estimate No. 17.. \. 3,351 46 
15 2 Capital News Pub. Co., Ltd., Pub. Notice of Sale of 

Bonds 12 65 

155 A. S. Whiteway & Co., Architect's Estimate No. 19. . . . 4,943 46 

156 A. S. Whiteway & Co., Architect's Estimate No. 20. . . . 4,446 48 

157 Syms-York Co., bonds 17 50 

161 A. S. Whiteway & Co., Architect's Estimate No. 21. . . . 2,288 9S 

162 A. S. Whiteway & Co., Architect's Estimate No. 22. . . . 2,302 34 



Total $25,595 56 

Unexpended balance, December, 1908 74,404 44 



$100,000 00 



U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND. 

(For the purchase of books for the Library.) 

Approprlalion $ 9,000 00 

312 The Boston Book Co., books and magazines $ 110 15 

311 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 6 07 

315 G. E, Stechert & Co., books 4 56 

316 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 2 35 

317 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 47 12 

3 Lovejoy & Lincoln, books 127 50 



APPENDIX 



4 Library Bureau, supplies 

5 National Education Association, proceedings 

6 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 

7 John W. Cadby, 40 vol. North Am. Review 

8 Library Bureau, binders 

9 Whitcomb & Barrows, domestic science books 

10 The Electrical World periodicals 

11 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

12 Hill Publishing Co., books 

13 G. E. Stechert & Co., Horace's Satires 

14 The Macmillan Co., 24 vol. A. E. A 

15 Carnegie Library, classified catalogue 

16 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 

17 Bursar account, freight 

2 7 Bursar account, freight 

28 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 

2 9 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

3 4 D. Van Nostrand Co., books 

35 Mining & Scientific Press, books 

36 Library Bureau, newspaper files 

37 Hill Publishing Co., books 

38 W. H. Lowdermilk & Co., Congressional Record. . . 

39 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

40 Spokesman-Review, subscription 

55 Western Mining Directory Co., mining manual . . . 

56 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

57 Economic Geology Publishing Co., books 

63 Bursar account, freight 

64 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 

65 McGraw Publishing Co., books 

66 The H. W. Wilson Co., Book Review Digest 

67 Hill Publishing Co., mining book 

68 Mining and Scientific Press, book 

69 The Boston Book Co., periodical 

70 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 

71 Library Bureau, book truck 

72 D. Van Nostrand Co., books 

73 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

74 Underwood & Underwood, sterescopic views 

75 Bursar account, freight 

91 A. C. McClurg & Co., Bible of English Literature. . 

92 Hill Publishing Co., Vol. IV., proceedings 

93 G. P. Stechert & Co., books 

94 Mutual Subscription Agency, subscriptions 

96 The Macmillan Co., books 

9 7 D. Van Nostrand Co., BJyth Poisons 

98 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

99 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

100 Bursar account, freight 

109 McGraw Publishing Co., books 

110 John Wiley & Sons, books 

111 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 

112 Bursar account, freight 

116 Hill Publishing Co., book 

117 A. C. McClurg & Co., 1907 Statesman's Year Book 

118 The Boston Book Co., periodicals 

119 A. C. McClurg & Co., books ' 

120 Lowman & Hanford, books 



XXVll 



14 


85 


2 


00 


28 


93 


60 


00 


40 


50 


3 


25 


32 


10 


161 


88 


25 


68 


1 


41 


59 


80 


14 


75 


206 


53 


7 


32 


32 


80 


12 


30 


150 


08 


2 


25 


7 


00 


10 


00 


2 


95 


12 


08 


18 


99 


5 


00 


10 


00 


32 


55 


20 


25 


9 


23 


38 


43 


1 


73 


8 


00 


9 


73 


2 


00 


2 


23 


120 


28 


30 


00 


2 


41 


32 


79 


63 


60 


11 


90 


1 


33 


5 


40 


16 


50 


290 


80 


26 


33 


6 


75 


21 


11 


4 


36 


7 


20 


3 


60 


2 


50 


171 


60 


16 


01 


2 


70 


2 


76 


17 


49 


22 


42 


13 


00 



XXviii APPENDIX 

121 TL.owman & Hanford, books 12 15 

122 Hill Publishing Co., Spurr's Geology 135 

123 The National Education Association, proceedings .... 2 00 

124 The Macmillan Co., books 2 23 

125 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 32 48 

126 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 14 12 

127 Bursar account, freight 10 68 

128 Bursar's account, freight 1 40 

130 American Institute of M. Eng., books 27 00 

131 Val Miller, book ; 3 33 

132 The Boston Book Co., books 8 06 

133 A. C. McClurg <fe Co., books 14 82 

134 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 87 92 

135 Librarj' Bureau, L. B. pens 1 04 

13 6 National Educational Asso., proceedings N. E. A 40 2 5 

137 A. N. Marquis & Co., "Who's Who in America" 4 00 

138 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 139 17 

139 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 119 91 

140 M. E. Lewis, books 25 19 

141 The Nature-Study Review, subscription 1 00 

143 Bursar's Account, freight 25 54 

147 Bursar's Account, freight and express 31 78 

148 The Horizontal F. Co., books 2 00 

15 3 Bursar's Account, freight 8 23 

154 Bursar's Account, freight 6 03 

158 Bursar's Account, freight 28 07 

159 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 204 14 

160 International Text Book 50 00 

163 Bursar's Account, freight 14 09 

164 The Boston Book Co , books 101 35 

165 John Wiley & Sons, books 6 00 

166 The Hicks-Judd Co., book-binding 163 43 

167 Library Bureau, books 18 45 

168 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 6 30 

169 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 8 00 

170 A. C. McClurg & Co., books 12 50 

171 The Hicks-Judd Co., book-binding 4120 

Total $ 3,512 40 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1908 5,487 60 



$ 9.000 00 

U. OF 1. RKBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(For the purchase and installing of equipment and 
machinery of ore mill.) 

Appropriation $ 5,000 00 

58 Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., watt meter... $ 42 00 

76 W. A. Lauder, lime and cement 16 35 

77 Washington Brick & Lime Mfg. Co., fire brick and clay 25 00 

78 J. J. Anthony, concentrating jig 26 25 

79 Colorado Iron Works Co., sundry equipment 48 00 

80 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundry equipment.... 42 00 

81 Frr-d Brauer, labor 11 50 

82 B. McConnell, labor 12 50 

83 Jof Weeks, labor 11 50 

84 Joe Weeks, labor 2 75 

95 Hendrie & Bolthoff Mfg. & Supply Co., concentrator. . 200 00 



APPENDIX 



XXIX 



101 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 15 45 

102 Standard Dry Co.. draya^e 15 00 

103 A. L. Vroman & Son. plumbing .supplies and equipment 13 29 

104 Allls-Chalmers Co., sundry equipment 14 69 

105 Electric Appliance Co., electrical equipment 58 71 

106 Bursar Account, freight 62 60 

113 General Electric Co., electrical supplies 5 11 

114 AUis-Chalmers Co., equipment for ore mill 3,995 00 

144 Bursar Account, freight on machinery 382 30 



Total $ 5,000 00 

U. OF I. REBUIliDlNG AND EQUIPMENT FUND. 

(For testing machine for Civil Engineering Department.) 
Appropriation $ 1,500 00 

59 Tinius Olsen & Co., testing machine $ 1,500 00 

U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(For Repairs to Building and Grading.) 
Appropriation .$1,000 00 

18 G. Crow, labor $ 15 00 

19 H. R. Russell, labor, man and team 24 00 

20 E. J. Sprouse. labor, man and team 27 00 

21 B. McConnell, labor 8 33 

22 Joe Weeks, labor, m.an and team 27 00 

23 E. J. Clarke, wages as foreman 22 66 

2 4 Fred Brauer, labor, two men and two teams 54 00 

30 H. Russell, labor, man and team 21 77 

31 E. J. Sprouse, labor, man and team 22 50 

32 G. Crow, labor 11 66 

33 Joe Weeks, labor, man and team 2 4 50 

41 Fred Brauer, labor, two men and two teams 54 00 

42 B. McConnell, labor , 15 00 

43 H. Russell, labor, man and team 4 00 

44 Fred Brauer, labor, two men and two teams 49 00 

45 Joe Weeks, labor, man and team 36 00 

46 E. J. Sprouse, labor, man and team 36 00 

47 Fred Brauer, labor, two men and two teams 72 00 

48 G. Crow, labor 6 11 

49 Joe Weeks, labor, man and team , . . . . 27 00 

50 E. J. Sprouse, labor, man and team 27 00 

51 E. J. Clarke, wages as foreman 26 67 

52 H. Russell, labor, man and team 24 00 

60 G. Crow, labor 20 00 

61 J. Driskill, labor 13 89 

62 Zumhof & Collins, blacksmithing supplies 6 50 

85 Bursar account, sundry labor 52 00 

115 L. A. Torsen 12 95 



Grand total $ 740 54 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1908 259 46 



$ 1,000 00 



XXX 



APPENDIX 



U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(For mounting- and placing specimens donated for educational 

purposes.) 

Appropriation $ 500 00 

145 Win. C. Cusick, specimens $ 11 12 

146 W. N. Suksdorf, specimens ,•••• 15 20 

Grand total $ 26 32 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1908 473 68 



$ 500 00 

U. OF I. REBUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND, 1907. 

(P^or permanent improvements for Auxiliary Statiori at Caldwell.) 
Appropriation $ 3,000 00 

25 Doan «& Hay Co., barbed wire and staples $ 58 60 

26 Canyon Lumber & Coal Co.. lumber 200 85 

53 Caldwell Lumber Co., lumber 20 65 

54 Idaho Implement Co., pipe and casing for well 63 40 

86 Caldwell Lumber Co., lumber 15 30 

87 E. E. Harthrong, cylinder pipe and casing for well. . . . 104 60 

88 Idaho Implement Co., pump and fixtures 86 47 

89 Elias Nelson, cash advanced for window sash and 

coupling 7 25 

90 C. O. Wilson, drilling well 191 50 

107 Tho.-?. H. Soule, plans and specifications for farm house 36 00 

108 Elias Nelson, cash advanced for digging cellar 10 25 

129 Elias Nelson, cash advanced for notice of bids on house 5 00 

Grand total $ 799 87 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1908 2,200 13 



$ 3.000 00 



U. OF I. INSURANCE FUND. 

(Morrill Hall.) 

601 Bursar's sundry pay roll $ 442 60 

602 Bursar's sundry pay roll 381 76 

603 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 9 60 

.604 W. A. Lauder, payment on contract 803 60 

605 Bursar's sundry pay roll 565 40 

606 J. C. Scheyer, payment on contract 288 00 

607 Bursar's sundry pay roll 509 91 

608 J. C. Scheyer, payment on contract 432 00 

609 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing 14 10 

610 Troy Lumber Company, lumber 39 00 

611 Bursar's sundry pay roll 454 52 

612 J. C. Scheyer, payment on contract 356 40 

613 Statesman Printing Co., publishing notice 6 00 

614 Bursar's sundry pay roll 511 03 

615 H. N. Black, architect fee 783 47 

616 Moscow Printing & Publishing Co., publishing notice 6 00 

617 Bursar's freight and express 9 00 

618 J. A. rV)]son & Son, payment on contract 1,953 15 

619 J. C. Scheyei', payment on contract 34 5 60 

620 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 4,059 12 



APPENDIX XXxi 

621 Lewiston Tribune, publishing notice 10 35 

622 Bursar's sundry pay roll 174 91 

623 J. C. Scheyer, payment on contract 234 00 

6 24 Palouse Pottery Co., fire clay 1 25 

625 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 2,926 08 

626 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 2,144 40 

627 Bursar's sundry pay roll 440 12 

628 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 2,234 04 

629 H. N. Black, architect fee 385 52 

630 Doerr-Mitchell & Co., electrical supplies 67 38 

631 Doerr-Mitchell & Co., electrical supplies 112 31 

632 Bursar's sundry pay roll 160 67 

633 Moscow Hardware Co., ventilators 10 00 

634 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 1,471 96 

635 Nels Peterson, plumbing and supplies 12 50 

636 Doerr-Mitchell & Co., electrical supplies 5 85 

637 A. L. Vroman & Son, payment on contract 400 00 

6 38 Bursar's sundry pay roll 125 50 

639 Bursar's sundry pay roll and freight 75 90 

640 Bursar's sundry pay roll and freight 385 82 

641 Moscow Electric Light Co., fire brick 3 50 

643 Rhodes Iron Works, chimney door 3 50 

644 J. A. Colson, payment on contract 1,335 40 

645 J. A. Colson, payment on contract 1,307 04 

646 Bursar's freight and sundry pay roll 110 33 

647 J. C. Scheyer, payment on contract 318 00 

648 H. N. Black, architect's fee 350 00 

649 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 708 00 

650 A. L. Vroman & Son, payment on contract 2,134 40 

6 51 W. A. Lauder, payment on contract 194 00 

652 Moscow Electric Co., 100 fire brick 3 50 

653 Doerr, Mitchell & Co., 200 feet 14= 100m 9 00 

654 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 1,236 00 

656 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 882 29 

658 A. L. Vroman & Son, payment on contract 6 40 00 

659 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 20 00 

660 Bursar's sundry pay roll 23 88 

661 J. A. Colson & Son, payment on contract 1,062 40 

822 Washington Brick & Lime Co., drain and sewer pipe. 68 39 

662 H. N. Black, architect's fee 286 26 

663 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 22 70 

664 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing and labor 50 33 

665 Bursar's sundry pay roll 66 58 

6 66 A. L. Vroman & Son, payment on contract 680 00 

667 Bursar's, masons and wiring 58 00 

668 Moscow Hardware Co., door bumpers 135 

669 Grice & Son, room furnishing ; 33 25 

670 Moscow Electric Light Co., electrical supplies 82 66 

671 A. L. Vroman & Son, extra plumbing 325 30 

701 First Trust Co., assigned labor 2,348 18 

704 Bursar's wiring 1 10 

705 Geo. Hallam, hanging window shades 34 30 

606 O. A. Benedict, carpenter 74 10 

707 W. A. Lauder, concrete supplies 242 70 

708 Springston Lumber Co., two doors 12 00 

709 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber for station 2 4 45 

710 J. C. Scheyer, payment on contract 468 50 

711 The Empire Hardware Co., cast man hole cover 14 22 



XXXll 



APPENDIX 



712 M. F. Zeigler, carpenter, labor and lumber 22 25 

713 John McMahon's account, Colson & Son 25 00 

714 Bursar's typewriting pay roll 50 

715 A. L. Vroman & Son, plumbing and supplies 35 46 

716 A. L, Vroman & Son, payment on contract 1,309 60 

717 Orr & Lockett Co., hardware supplies 8 18 

718 Bursar's, teams, labor and grading 72 40 

720 Bursar's, Flanagan & Son 118 80 

721 Electric Appliance Co., appliance 15 30 

722 Moscow Hardware Co., paints and stops 13 40 

728 J. C. Scheyer, final payment on contract 100 00 

729 J. C. Flanagan & Son, painting 38 40 

730 McMahon & Scheyer, account Colson & Son 100 00 

740 C. G. Haydon, wages 12 15 

741 G. V. Pickens, wages 18 00 

742 Roy E. Zeigler, wages 22 50 

743 A. E. Mowre, wages 27 00 

744 H. C. Aosved, wages 55 60 

745 Glenn Zeigler, wages 2160 

754 Wm. Mills, wages 21 60 

755 J. C. Scheyer, wages 36 00 

756 A. E. Mowre, wages 27 00 

757 Glenn Zeigler, wages , 21 60 

758 H. C. Aosved, wages 21 60 

75 9 M. F. Zeigler, wages 36 00 

760 Moscow Hardware, wages 28 95 

761 C. G. Hayton, wages 24 30 

762 Roy E. Zeigler, wages 27 00 

763 A. J. Plummer, wages 27 00 

764 A. E. Mowre, wages 27 00 

765 Glenn Zeigler, wages 21 60 

766 H. C. Aosved, wages 21 60 

767 J. C. Flanagan, wages 24 50 

792 A. Anderson, assigned to First Trust Co 45 82 

938 Jones & Dillingham, oil for paint 38 54 

955 Benj. Zeitler, wages 28 00 

9 56 LeVerne Zeigler, wages 15 55 

957 Floyd Rader, wages .... 23 50 

958 J. C. Flanagan & Son, wages 44 73 

95 9 John Manley, wages 7 00 

960 John Belton, wages 18 86 

965 A. L. Vroman & Son., fire hose appliances 77 70 

966 H. A. Scheyer, wages 30 00 

967 Roy E. Zeigler, wages 15 00 

968 A. G. Plummer, wages 30 00 

969 A. E. Mowre, wages 30 00 

970 C. C. Hunter, wages 30 00 

971 Floyd Rader, wages 30 00 

972 M. F. Ebel, wages 14 77 

973 M. F. Zeigler, wages 9 00 

925 Springton Lumber Co., flooring lumber 360 00 

9 74 Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 4 75 

97 9 Ben Zeitler, wages 7 50 

980 Roy Zeigler, wages 19 00 

951 H. A. Scheyer, wages 19 00 

952 A. G. Plummer, wages 17 50 

984 C. C. Hunter, wages 21 50 

983 Floyd Rader, wages 17 50 



APPENDIX 



XXXlll 



985 A. E. Mowre, wages 12 50 

986 M. F. Zeigler, wages 6 00 

987 John Manly, wages 3 50 

988 H. Belton, wages 21 00 

989 J. C. Flanagan, wages 21 00 

990 Empire Hardware Co., paints 18 50 

992 Standard Dray Co., hauling 6 50 

993 Benj. Zeitler, wages 6 00 

994 Verne Zeigler, wages 2 50 

995 H. A. Scheyer, wages 19 50 

996 Roy Zeigler, wages 17 50 

997 A. G. Plummer, wages 20 75 

998 A. E. Mowre, wages 17 00 

999 C. C, Hunter, wages 19 50 

1000 Floyd Rader, wages 17 00 

1001 J. C. Flanagan, wages 21 00 

1002 H. Belton, wages 21 00 

1003 M. F. Zeigler, wages 6 00 

1004 Troy Lumber Co., lumber 867 00 

1005 Jones & Dillingham, D. S. glass 10 40 

1006 H. A. Scheyer, wages 8 00 

1007 A. E. Mowre, wages 12 50 

1008 R. E. Zeigler, wages 12 50 

1009 C. C. Hunter, wages 12 50 

1010 Floyd Rader, wages 12 50 

1011 M. F. Zeigler, wages 6 00 

1012 H. H. Walzer, wages 3 99 

1013 J. C. Flanagan, wages 14 00 

1014 H. Belton, wages 10 50 

1015 C. A. Randall, wages 12 00 

1017 H. Belton, wages 15 75 

1018 Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 29 50 

316 Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 6 85 

317 Tull & Gibbs, window shades 78 35 

319 J. C. Flanagan, paints ' 20 55 

320 Springton Lumber Co., lumber 16 95 

321 W. A. Lauder, supplies and contract 532 40 

331 Collins & Orland, hardware supplies 22 10 

332 Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 15 80 

333 Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 2 4 35 

334 C. A. Randall, painter 2 65 

335 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 122 70 

344 Moscow Electrical Supply Co., electrical fixtures and 

supplies 50 75 

346 W. A. Lauder, cement 2 50 

347 Troy Lumber Co., partition 18 68 

348 H. Hallam, carpenter — partition 24 75 

351 Madison Lumber Co., partition lumber 9 80 

1 Empire Hardware Co.. fire escapes 16 77 

2 Collins & Orland, door furnishings 135 15 

3 B. McConnell, fire escapes 13 75 

4 Benj. Zeitler, carpenter 4 00 

5 C. C. Hunter, carpenter 12 00 

6 A. E. Mowre, carpenter 12 00 

20 J. C. Flanagan, painter 14 10 

21 Moscow Hardware Co., paint 1 25 

28 J. C. Flanagan, painting fire escapes 5 00 

Total disbursements $44,368 63 



XXxiv APPENDIX 

U. OF I. INSURANCE FUND. 

(Administration Building.) 

801 Bursar's Sundry Labor $ 399 76 

802 Bursar's Sundry Labor 283 48 

805 Bursar's Sundry Labor 402 72 

806 Bursar's Sundry Labor 265 26 

807 Bursar's Sundry Labor 116 70 

808 Moscow Hardware Co., six wheelbarrows 19 50 

809 Bursar's Sundry Labor 129 82 

810 Spokesman Review, advertising 11 55 

811 Statesman Printing Co., advertising 5 50 

812 J. E. Tourtellotte «& Co., architect's fee 28 29 

814 Bursar's — freight on stone and tile 715 50 

816 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervising architect 54 20 

818 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervising architect 37 30 

819 Bursar's, freight on stone 632 00 

821 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervising architect 13 35 

823 Toui'tellotte & Co., supervising architect 2,195 72 

824 Tourtellotte & Co., supervising architect 5 40 

826 Bursar's, freight on tailings 202 40 

827 J. T. Corcoran, timekeeper 141 75 

702 E. J. Clarke, foreman 171 00 

703 M. L. Romig, labor 42 67 

828 Mrs. E. Corcoran, clerk 15 00 

829 Chas. Swan, labor by C. T. Smith 18 90 

8 30 E. J. Clarke, labor by C. T. Smith 9 90 

831 W. L. Payne, labor by D. Murphy 20 00 

832 O. C. Carson, labor by D. Murphy 5 00 

833 D. Murphy, labor 16 10 

834 F. W. Zumhof, labor 7 50 

835 E. Vogle, labor 21 65 

863 R. E. White, labor 14 15 

837 J. H. Horton, labor 29 33 

838 W. • A. Lauder, labor by G. F. Savage and H. R. 

Russell 55 85 

839 A. L. Jones, labor 22 35 

840 Fred Skog, labor 41 55 

841 S. Schnonson, labor 23 05 

842 H. A. Colt, labor 9 45 

843 r. X. Harris, labor 20 55 

844 A. Douglas, labor 15 78 

845 M. L. Tyler, labor 11 85 

846 P. B. Carter, labor 23 05 

847 W. A. Sheets, labor 30 68 

8 48 F. Brewer, labor 8 00 

849 Joe Weeks, labor 19 57 

850 C. J. Bessie, labor 40 57 

851 J. A. MacLean, traveling and consultation 224 40 

8.S2 Foundation Contract — week ending May 18 1.000 00 

853 Foundation Contract— week ending June 1 800 00 

854 Foundation Contract — week ending June 8 900 00 

855 Kansas Portland Cement Co., 340 bbls (rp $4.15 . 1,411 00 

S56 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N., freight, stone and tail- 
ings 365 90 

857 Kansas Portland Cement Co., 340 bbls. (a) $3.85 

and 40c 1,445 00 

858 Foundation Contract — June 22 1.000 00 

859 Foundation Contract — June 29 1,000 00 



APPENDIX 



XXXV 



50 
15 



50 
00 



860 Kansas Portland Cement Co., 170 bbls @ $3.85 

and 40c 722 

861 H. D. Mitchell, 510 sq. ft. Ashlar (ti) 86.5 cents 441 

862 Kansas Portland Cement Co., 170 bbls @ $3.85 

and 40c 722 50 

863 Kansas Portland Cement Co., 170 bbls. @ $3.85 

and 40c 7 22 

864 Foundation Contract — July 6 1,000 

865 The Idaho-Washing:ton Light «t Power Co., electrical 

supplies 10 03 

866 F. M. Price, labor 10 67 

867 The Oregonian, notice for bids 44 60 

868 Statt^sman Printing- Co., notice tor bids 19 95 

869 Improvement Bulletin, notice for bids 12 00 

870 J. E. Tourtellotte <& Co., architect's and supervision 

fee 60 

871 Pacific States Tel. & Tel. Co.. telephone 2 

8 72 Spokesman Review, notice for bids 39 

873 Tourtellotte & Co., architect sup<^rvision fee 139 

8 74 Times Printing Co., notice for bids 49 

875 Tourtellotte & Co., architect's fee 3,294 

8 76 Foundation Contract — July 6 1,000 

8 77 F. Peasley, labor 5 

878 David & Ely Co., Ltd., labor by J. R. Smith 39 

879 Union Iron Works, structural iron 350 

880 Pacific States Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 1 

881 Tourtellotte & Co., architect supervision fee 135 

882 C. Leach, labor 5 

88 3 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N.. freight on tailings .... 2 74 

884 Foundation Contract — July 13 1,000 

885 Empire Co., tools and sundry hardware 12 

886 The Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., power ... 25 
719 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N., freight on tailings 340 

887 Springton Lumber Co., lumber for forms 335 

888 Nixon & Kemmel, rent for motor 20 

889 Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 55 

890 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N.. freight on tailings 266 

891 Foundation Contract — July 27 1,000 

892 D. H. Mitchell, 365.85 sq. ft. of stone (a) 86.5c 661 

8 93 Rhod-'^s Iron Works, derrick irons 11 

894 Foundation Contract — August 3 1,000 

895 Kansas Cement Co., draft 140 bbls. cement 582 

896 Kansas Cement Co., draft 150 bbls. cement 623 

897 Kansas Cement Co., draft 150 bbls. cement 623 

898 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N., freight on tailings .... 337 

899 R. W. Morris, Agent, 75 sacks cement 70 

900 T. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N., freight on tailings. ... 95 

901 Foundation Contract — August 10 700 

902 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 41 

903 Empire Hardware Co., hardware supplies 65 

904 Statesman Printing Co., notice to contractors 25 

90.J Nixon & Kimmel, motor rent 10 

906 The Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., power, . . 27 

907 Pacific States Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 2 

9u8 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 117 

909 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N., freight on tailings 195 

910 Zumhof & Collins, blacksmithing 46 

911 Spokesman-Review, notice for bids 51 

912 G. Weber, lace leather 1 



00 
20 
60 
15 
15 
10 
00 
00 
29 
65 
75 
20 
00 
14 
00 
84 
00 
63 
80 
00 
51 
40 
00 
04 
50 
00 
20 
8 5 
85 
06 
31 
75 
00 
30 
69 
20 
00 
00 
02 
00 
55 
37 
25 
00 



XXXVl 



APPENDIX 



913 David & Ely Co., Ltd., oil 55 

914 Springton Lumber Co.. lumber 145 58 

915 A.Tate, assigned to Anna L. Tate, labor 30 5 5 

916 A. Tate, assigned to Max Griffith, labor 10 00 

917 Improvement Bulletin, notice for bids 17 10 

939 Pacific Builder & Eng., notice for bids 14 10 

940 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. & N., freight on tailings 137 37 

941 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., hardware supplies.. 3 15 

942 Empire Hardware Co., sundries 1 00 

961 The Oregonian, notice to contractors 61 60 

962 A. L. Vroman & Son, labor and plumbing supplies ... 650 
964 The Idaho-Washington Light & Power Co., power.... 17 40 

975 Times Printing Co., notice to contractors 59 22 

9 76 The Idaho Post, notice to contractors 6 90 

991 I. T. Ames, Agent O. R. N., freight on cut stone 150 00 

1016 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 100 00 

312 R. ^^. Morris, Agent, freight on sacks 5 4 48 

322 Foundation contract 550 00 

324 G. Hallam, wages 12 75 

32 5 N. S. Mewhinney, wages 12 75 

326 B. McConnell, wages 11 39 

32 7 J. Wilson, wages 11 39 

328 W. Johns, wages 12 50 

329 C. Olsen, wages 10 00 

3 30 H. Dessered, wages 10 00 

336 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 112 75 

338 ^^. A. Lauder, 51 sacks cement 54 20 

339 J. Driskill, wage.<5 69 

3 40 J. Wilson, wages 2 50 

3 41 W. J. Johns, wages 2 50 

342 C. Olsen 2 50 

343 H. Dissered, wages 2 50 

350 H. D. Mitchell, cut stone 548 25 

7 G. Hallam, carpenter 13 50 

8 N. S. Mewhinney, carpenter 13 50 

9 J. E. Tourtellotte & Co., supervision 146 86 

10 E. McConnell, mason 9 75 

11 J. Hansen, mason helper 6 50 

12 W. Johns, laborer 17 50 

13 B. McConnell, laborer 25 2 8 

14 T. J. Hunt, carpenter 12 22 

15 G. Hallam, carpenter 2 00 

1 6 Joe Weeks, man and team 6 5 

17 Frank Rayburn, laborer 4 16 

18 W. A. Lauder, cement 31 87 

1 9 W. A. Lauder, lime, cement and sand 82 70 

22 A. S. Whiteway & Co., central structure 186 00 

23 A. S. Whiteway & Co., central structure 1,128 00 

24 Kansas Portland Cement Co., cement 59 79 

26 Zumhof ^^ Collins, blacksmithing 10 85 

2 7 M. L. Romig, labor 7 5 

29 M. L. Romig, labor 3 33 

30 W. B. McConnell, labor 1 66 

Total $35,886 8 9 



APPENDIX XXXvii 

U. OF I. INSURANCE FUND. 

803 P. J. Person, part payment on site heating plant $ 800 00 

55 6 P. J. Person, final payment on site heating- plant 400 00 

557 Canyon Lumber «S: Coal Co., loan to Auxiliary Station. . 200 85 

558 John W. Cadby, loan to Library Fund 60 00 

559 Doan & Hay Co., loan to Auxiliary Station Fund 58 60 

725 A. C. McClurg & Co., loan to Library Fund 28 93 

726 The National Educational Association, loan to Library 

Fund 2 00 

727 Lovejoy & Lincoln, loan to Library Fund 127 50 

Libiary Bureau, draft 14 85 

31 P. H. Danley, sand for Green House 20 00 

32 J. H. Hansen, labor 12 00 



Total $ 1,724 73 

LOCAL MAINTENANCE FUND. 

560 Benjamin Zeitler, carpenter $ 2 9 50 

561 William Mills, carpenter 14 40 

562 Leverne Zeigler, carpenter 5 00 

563 Gus Radke, carpenter 15 00 

56 4 Henry McGregor, carpenter 8 89 

565 H. A. Scheyer, carpenter 6 50 

566 C. G. Haydon, carpenter 8 10 

567 J. C. Scheyer, plasterer and mason 9 33 

56S McDowell & Clayton, 8 yds. of sand , 14 00 

569 M. F. Zeigler, carpenter 51 33 

570 Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 19 45 

571 Benjamin Zeitler, carpenter 27 00 

572 William Mills, carpenter 2160 

573 Leverne Zeigler, carpenter 15 00 

574 Gus Radke, carpenter 18 00 

575 H. McGregor, helper , 15 00 

576 J. C. Scheyer, plaster 30 00 

5 7 7 H. C. Scheyer, carpenter 22 50 

578 C. G. Haydon, carpenter 24 30 

579 J. H. Estes, helper 12.50 

580 G. V. Pickens, helper 13 33 

581 L. E. Zeigler, helper 18 00 

582 A. G. Plummer. helper 18 00 

583 A. E. Moore, helper 18 00 

584 Frank Rayburn, helper 7 50 

585 M. F. Zeigler, foreman 36 00 

586 Benjamin Zeitler, carpenter 27 00 

587 William Mills, carpenter 2160 

588 I<everne Zeigler, carpenter helper 15 00 

589 Gus Radke, mason helper 18 00 

590 Henry McGregor, helper 13 8 9 

591 J. C. Scheyer, plasterer 36 00 

592 H. A. Scheyer, carpenter 27 00 

593 C. G. Haydon, carpenter 24 30 

594 J. H. Estes, helper 10 00 

595 G. V. Pickens, carpenter, helper 18 00 

596 Roy Zeigler, carpenter 27 00 

597 A. G. Plummer, carpenter '.. 27 00 

598 A. E. Moore, carpenter 27 00 

599 Frank Rayburn, helper • 10 00 

600 Glenn Zeigler, carpenter 10 80 



XXXVlll 



APPENDIX 



72 3 M. F. Zeigler, foreman . . 

724 P. S. Danley, 3 yds. sand @ $2.50 

731 Benjamin Zeitler, carpenter 

732 William Mills, carpenter 

733 Leverne Zeig-ler, carpenter helper 

(34 Gus Radke, mason helper 

735 Henry McGregor, helper 

736 J. C. Scheyer, plasterer 

737 H. A. Scheyer, carpentei- 

738 A. G. Plummer, carpenter 

73 9 M. F. Zeigler, foreman 

7 46 Henry McGregor, wages , 

747 G. V. Pickens, wages , 

7 4S A. G. Plummer, wages , 

7 49 P. H. Danly, 2 V2 yds. sand 

750 Potlatch Lumber Co., lumber 

751 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 

752 Moscow Hardware Co., hardware 

753 Moscow Electric Sup. Co., supplies and labor, 

TGS Benjamin Zeitler, wages 

76 9 Wm. Mills, wages 

770 H. McGregor, wages 

771 J. C. Scheyer, wages 

772 H. A. Scheyer, wages 

7 7 3 G. V. Pickins, wages 

774 M. F. Zeigler, wages 

775 E. Krier, wages 

'. i 6 J. C. Flanagan & Son, wages 

777 Benj. Zeitler, wages 

7 78 M'm. Mills, wages 

779 LeVerne Zeigler, wages 

780 Gus Radeke, wages 

781 J. C. Sheyer, wages 

7 82 H. A. Scheyer, wages 

7 83 Roy E. Zeigler, wages 

784 A. G. Plummer, wages 

785 A. E. Mowre,, wages 

786 Glenn Zeigler, wages 

7 8 7 H. C. Aosved, wages 

788 E. H. Krier, wages 

789 J. C. Flanagan, wages 

790 M. F. Zeigler, wages ■ 

7 9 3 Ben E. Bush, surveying land 

794 Benj. Zeitler, wages ... 

795 LeVerne Zeigler, wages 

796 H. A. Scheyer, wages 

7 97 Roj' Zeigler, wages 

798 A. G. Plummer, wages 

799 A. E. Mowre, wages 

800 Glenn Zeigler, wages 

918 H. C. Aosved, wages 

919 C. C. Hunter, wages 

920 M. F. Zeigler, wages 

J21 J. C. Flanagan & .Son, wages 

922 Tennis & Thompson, 31/2 yds. sand (S) 50c ... 

923 Arthur McDowell, 1 1-3 yds. sand (5) $1.50... 

924 Springton Lumber Co., lumber 

926 Benj. Zeitler, wages 

927 H. A. Scheyer, wages , 



36 


00 


7 


50 


27 


00 


21 


60 


15 


00 


18 


00 


14 


45 


36 


00 


27 


00 


27 


00 


36 


00 


15 


00 


18 


00 


27 


00 


6 


2 5 


412 


25 


5 


15 


69 


48 


35 


32 


27 


00 


21 


60 


15 


00 


36 


00 


27 


00 


18 


00 


36 


00 


30 


00 


29 


16 


15 


50 


4 


00 


8 


61 


9 


00 


20 


00 


15 


50 


14 


00 


16 


00 


14 


00 


11 


20 


21 


60 


6 


00 


24 


89 


9 


33 


12 


00 


27 


00 


15 


00 


27 


00 


9 


00 


27 


00 


27 


00 


14 


40 


21 


60 


20 


00 


12 


00 


33 


83 


1 


75 


2 


00 


60 


5 5 


27 


00 


27 


00 



APPENDIX XXxix 

928 Roy Zeigler, wages 27 00 

92 9 A. G. Plummer, wages 27 00 

930 A. E. Mowre, wages 27 00 

931 C. C. Hunter, wages 17 25 

932 J. C. Flanagan, wages 38 50 

933 M. F. Zeigler, wages 9 00 

934 Jones & Dillingham, oil for paint 4 28 

935 Collins & Orland Co., hardware 22 05 

93 6 Empire Hardware Co., hardware 13 15 

791 and 937 — Troy Lumber Co., hardware; total 389 14 

944 A. L. Vronian & Son, plumbing 91 81 

945 Jones & Dillingham, glass 13 11 

946 Madison Lumber Co., lumber 3 40 

947 Julia A. Moore, purchase of land 1,001 50 

948 W. A. Lauder, material 250 70 

949 H. A. Scheyer, wages 28 00 

950 Roy E. Zeigler, wages 28 00 

951 A. G. Plummer, wages 28 00 

952 A. E. Mowre, wages 28 00 

953 C. C. Hunter, wages 28 00 

954 M. F. Zeigler, wages 9 00 

977 Moscow Hardware Co., hardware supplies 58 06 

978 Benj. Zeitler, wages 30 00 

25 Local Fund, transfer from Maintenance to L. Fd 382 92 

501 Burroughs Adding Machine Co., adding machine .... 270 00 

502 Collins & Orland Hdw. Co., hardware supplies 12 65 

503 Collins & Orland Hdw. Co.. mining tools 80 

504 Collins & Orland Hdw. Co., hardware 3 50 

505 Mrs. S. H. Hays, Regent's expense 35 97 

506 O. E. McCutcheon, Regent's traveling expense 62 85 

507 The Statesman Printing Co., Regent's stationery 16 50 

Unexpended balance 961 84 



$ 6,357 32 



U. OF I. IMPROVEMENT FUND, 1903. 

Disbursements. Receipts. 

To Legislative Appropriation $18,000 00 

Return on freight 14 75 

Furniture and fixtures $ 113 35 

Domestic Science equipment 2,008 77 

Mining Eng. supplies and equipment 2,081 71 

Electrical Eng. supplies and equipment 4,567 9 9 

Land 823 70 

Water supply and improvements on system. . . 2,259 89 

Mining cases 201 80 

Mechanical Eng. equipment 1,989 10 

Electric light appliances 101 43 

Electro-Physical supplies and equipment 203 00 

Electro-Civil Eng. supplies and equipment 239 74 

Traveling expenses 587 60 

Attic Chamber Mining building 1,120 94 

Mining exhibits 10 00 

Building repairs 342 95 

Freight and express 85 80 

Forge building 678 58 

Litigation 548 55 

Farm improvemert 49 85 



$18,014 75 $18,014 75 



Xl APPP]NDIX 



ST ATI-: nrPIUnKMENT ITJND, 1905. 

(For the Purchase of Books for the Library.) 

To Legislativ^e Appropriation $ 3,000 00 

Refund on freight October 8, 1906 9 75 

Disbursements to December 1. 1906 $ 2,546 73 

296 H. W. Wilson Co., U. S. Catalog- Supolem't 6 00 

297 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 180 73 

29 S G. E. Stechert & Co., Keats' Works 1 SO 

33 Oxford University Press, 1 student's hand- 
book 80 

313 G. E. Stechert & Co., books 64 94 

312 The Boston Book Co., books and maga- 
zines 208 75 



Grand total $ 3,009 75 $ 3,009 70 

BOND INDEMNITY FUND. 

Receipts from litigation '. $ 2.239 75 

To sale of house 1,000 00 

94 7 James A. MacDean, part payment on site 

Assay Building $ 1,075 00 

550 Crane & Co.. unpaid Vill of plumbing con- 

tractor 500 00 

551 James A. MacLean, final payment on site 

Assay Building 1.075 00 

55 5 P. J. Persson, part payment on site Cen- 
tral heating plant 400 00 

943 Bur.sar Account, sundry labor 21 50 

963 Mine & Smelter Supply Co., mining sup- 
plies 168 25 



$ 3,239 75 .$ 3,239 75 

V. OF r. IMI'ROVFMENT FUND. 1905. 

Appropriation $40,000 00 

(For the Erection and E(iuipment of a Metallurgical L/aboratory.) 
Disbursements to December 1. 1906 . $29,632 13 

52 Holley-Mason Hardware Co., equipment 13 51 

53 Frank Zeigler, payment on contract 633 60 

54 Bursar Account, sundry cash advanced 168 35 

5 5 W. A. Lauder, biMck, lime and cement 56 00 

56 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co.. lumber 30 65 

57 A. L. Vroman & Son, payment of contract ,. 150 00 

58 General Electric Co., el'^ctrical equipment 19 16 

.")0 Bursar Account, freight on sewer pipe 9 60 

60 Washington Brick <^ Lime Co., sewer pipe 151 40 

61 Palouse Pottery Co., furnace lining 426 00 

62 Trov Lumber Co., flooring 9 20 

63 W. A. Lauder, brick, lime and sand 72 00 

6 4 T^nion Iron Works, grate bars 13 32 

6 5 Bursar Account, sundry labor 16 85 

66 H. N. Black, architect 191 45 

67 M. F. Zeigler, payment on contract 6,424 03 

68 Troy Lumber & Mfg. Co., jig tank 38 50 

60 Denver Fire Clay Co., sundry equipment 73 75 

70 J. C. Scheyer, pointing inside wall 75 00 

71 M. F. Zeigler, brick and sand 78 08 

72 M. F. Zeigler, plate glass 29 00 

73 Union Iron Works, stamp shoe and die 1 55 

74 Henry Troemner, sundry equipment 24 00 

75 Collins <fe Orlfind Hardware Co., equipment and sup- 

plies 140 15 



APPENDIX Xli 

76 Slurtevant Mill Co., laboratory crusher and rolls 200 00 

77 Bursar Account, sundry labor 27 95 

78 J. E. Doughty, sundry supplies 6 75 

79 Zumhof & Collins, sundry supplies 14 25 

80 Colorado Iron Works Co., Contr. Paym't for shafting.. 83 00 

SI Bradley Engineering & M'ch'y Co., 3 pulleys 7 21 

82 Union Iron Worlcs, equipment 13 15 

53 Bursar Account, sundry labor and freight 36 99 

54 Collins & Orland Hardware Co., sundiy hardware.... 38 05 

85 Moscow Electric Supply Co., electrical equipment. ... 7 22 

86 E. J. Sprouse, labor 22 50 

87 J. Crow, labor * 5 00 

88 J. DriskJll, labor 7 50 

S9 Joe Weeks, labor 18 00 

90 Fred Brauer, labor 31 50 

91 The Calkins Co., sundry equipment 55 13 

92 Francis Jenkins, cash advanced, for hardware 11 74 

93 Moscow Transfer Co 8 00 

94 W. John:3, labor 13 33 

95 B. McConnell, labor 3 05 

96 J. Hansen, labor 11 00 

97 E. McConnell, labor 16 50 

98 E. J. Clarke, salary 24 00 

99 Interstate Rubber Co., Inc., hose and fixtures 29 78 

100 General Electrical Co., stoves ' 17 14 

101 J. J. Aathony, storm sash and fixtures 11 25 

102 B. McConnell, labor 37 50 

103 Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., 2 wattmeters 18 40 

104 Bursur Account, sundry labor and freight 27 57 

105 C. Clendenning, labor 34 16 

106 Empire Hardware Co., sundry hardware 7 85 

107 The Hen(Jrie & Bolthoff M. & S. Co., wire screen 8 64 

108 Idaho National Harvester Co., boiler front 50 00 

109 B. McConnell, labor 21 39 

110 Standard Lumber Co., equipment 103 IH 

Total $39,505 93 

Unexpended balance December ], 1908 494 07 



$40,000 00 

SUMMARY OF U. OF I. IxM PKOV EMENT FUND, 1905. 

(For the Erection and Equipment of a Metallurgical Laboratory.) 

To Appropriation $40,000 00 

By Site $ 3,708 10 

By Publishing Notice 218 15 

By Contract to Build 30,614 83 

By Fees for Architect's Supervision 1,807 43 

By Plumbing 150 00 

By Equipment 2,333 83 

By Traveling Expense , 8 35 

I3y Electrical Wiring and Supplies 115 97 

By Sewer and Drain 161 00 

By Extra Painting, inside wall 104 00 

By Grading and Leveling 84 50 

By Freight 19 74 

By Cement Steps 67 88 

By Installing Machinery 112 15 

Unexpend'^d Balance December 1, 1908 494 07 



$40,000 00 $40,000 00